Politics, Philosophy, and Economics

Politics, Philosophy and Economics Major

Learn more about this major

Major Requirements: 14 courses, 54 credits

Core Requirements (8 classes, 30 credits)

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to the American political system and constitutional framework. Focus will be on the interplay of various institutions (the Presidency, Congress and the Judiciary) in creating public policies. Contemporary public issues will be discussed, as will the role of political theory in shaping American democracy. Attention will be given to the role of the news media, public opinion, political ideology, political parties and interest groups in the American system.

Prerequisites:

Non CAS majors need to have completed at least 15 credits.

Credits:

3

Description:

This course introduces students to foundational principles of microeconomic theory, with an emphasis on applications of concepts to management decision-making in specific industry and market settings. It describes and analyzes the interaction of supply and demand and the behavior of the prices of goods, services. It explains the determinations of costs, output, strategic pricing, and governance by firms under conditions of perfect and imperfect competition in a global economy. In addition, it describes the supply demand for factors of production and the impact of taxes and government regulation and intervention on firms and consumers.

Prerequisites:

Non-CAS majors need to have completed at least 15 credits

Credits:

3

Description:

This course examines the workings of the national and the global economy. It will describe the determination of Gross Domestic Product, the problems of unemployment, inflation, and the determination of economic growth. It will also describe and analyze the determination of the country's exchange rate, the balance of payments, and international borrowing and lending. A particular focus will be on understanding economic fluctuations (booms, busts, and recessions) in the domestic economy and its effects on other economies. It will analyze the role of the government and the effects of government spending and taxation on the economy. Furthermore, it will describe and analyze the determination of the quantity of money and interest rates in the economy and the role of the country's central bank. It examines the basis and pattern of international trade and the effects of a country's trade policy on the economy.

Credits:

4

Description:

In this class you will be introduced to the perspectives and methods of politics, philosophy, and economics and see how these three disciplines present distinct but interconnected dimensions of current social and political issues.

Credits:

4

Description:

An examination of persistent debates in political and social philosophy. Topics covered can include the meaning of property and welfare, the tensions between liberty and equality, censorship and freedom of expression, the relation of church and state, human rights and the common good, the possibility of political education and civic virtue, legitimacy of the state, revolution and counter-revolution, war and problems of ends and means, addressing historic injustices, such as racism, genocide, or sexism, among other topics. Students will read both classic and contemporary writings to address both the historical roots and the contemporary treatment of these questions. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

PHIL-119, PHIL-120, PHIL-123, or PHIL-127 and 2 of the following courses: GVT-110, GVT-201, GVT-225, EC-101, EC-102, PHIL-212, PHIL-250, STATS-240, STATS-250. PPE students only. Senior status required.

Credits:

4

Description:

This interdisciplinary class brings together the fields of politics, philosophy, and economics at a high academic level. You will be confronted with hard questions about the sources, ends, and limits of government; the usefulness and troubles of free markets; the proper distribution of economic advantages in society; and what works best for building a just and efficient system of economic institutions.

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces various approaches of comparative politics, such as institutionalism, structuralism, political culture, corporatism, state-society relationship, political economy, etc. Applies the different approaches to explain how various factors affect government institutions, sociopolitical and economic development in different societies. An effort is made to include countries from all regions of the world. Normally offered every semester.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course examines a range of contemporary issues introducing students to the U.S. Constitution and the fundamental concepts of constitutional law. Students discuss and analyze topics including separation of powers, federalism, freedom of speech, the death penalty, gun control, and civil rights. We will explore current constitutional challenges and their relationship to law and society.

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

Sophomore Standing GVT 110 and 120 and Math 128 or higher.

Credits:

4

Description:

Quantitative analysis is quickly changing the way we understand and engage in politics, how we implement policy, and how organizations across the world make decisions. In this course, we will learn the fundamental principles of statistical inference and develop the necessary programming skills to answer a wide range of political and policy oriented questions with data analysis. Who is most likely to win the upcoming presidential election? Do countries become less democratic when leaders are assassinated? Is there racial discrimination in the labor market? These are just a few of the questions we will work on in the course.

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to formal (or semi-formal) study of the basic types of deductive arguments (propositional and syllogistic logic). 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

Math 128 or higher. REMINDER: STATS 240 is a required prerequisite MKT 220, FIN 200 and ISOM 201(prerequisite for ISOM 319)

Credits:

4

Description:

Topics include: data presentation, measures of central locations and dispersion, probability and probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression models. The use of Excel and SPSS will be emphasized throughout the course. 1 term - 4 credits (4 hours per week). Normally offered each semester. STATS 240 satisfies the same requirements as STATS 250

Prerequisites:

MATH 128 or higher. REMINDER: STATS 250 is a required prerequisite MKT 220, FIN 200 and ISOM 201(prerequisite for ISOM 319)

Credits:

4

Description:

Application of statistical analysis to real-world business and economic problems. Topics include data presentation, descriptive statistics including measures of location and dispersion, introduction to probability, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions including binomial and normal distributions, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical inference including estimation and hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression analysis. The use of computers is emphasized throughout the course. Normally offered each semester.

Electives (6 courses, 24 credits)

Choose two courses from each of the groups A, B, and C listed below:
 
A. Government
Choose one Government course at the 200-level or higher and one at the 300-level or higher.

 

B. Philosophy
Choose one Philosophy course at the 200-level or higher and one at the 300-level or higher.

 

C. Economics
Choose two Economics courses from the list below, at least one must be at the 300-level or higher.

Credits:

4

Description:

Identifies the environmental effects of economic activity, including polluted water and air, noise, and radiation, and values their costs and benefits. Analyzes mechanisms, including taxes and permits, for achieving a socially preferable level of pollution. Traces role played by institutions, including common ownership, in affecting environmental decay. Resource depletion (of oil, forests, and fisheries) and appropriate policy responses.

Credits:

4

Description:

"Why do so many countries remain so poor? Why have some (e.g. the Asian ""tigers"") grown so rapidly? Why have most of the countries of Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union been slow to ignite economic growth? These questions are addressed by looking at domestic factors (government policies"

Credits:

4

Description:

The study of how economic and human activity is distributed across space, the reasons for these spatial distributions, and the processes that change the spatial organization of economic activity over time. Topics include: maps, map projections, and geographic information systems; population geography; the organization and location of cities, towns and villages; transportation and communication policy; industrial location; the geography of world trade; and geographic features of economic development. The course takes a global perspective, and draws on cases and examples from all over the world. Cultural Diversity B

Prerequisites:

EC 101 and EC 102

Credits:

4

Description:

Theory of consumer behavior and demand. Theory of production and costs of production. Theory of the firm, and price and output decisions in different market structures, i.e., under perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly. Decisions relating to pricing and employment of various inputs (labor and capital) under perfectly competitive, and less than perfectly competitive, resource markets. Required of all majors in Economics. Normally offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

EC 101 and EC 102

Credits:

4

Description:

The theory of tax policy and tax structure. The effects on economic behavior (including labor supply, saving, risk-taking and investment, charitable giving, and growth) of different taxes (income, sales, value-added, inheritance, wealth, property). Tax equity, efficiency and incidence, in the United States and in comparative perspective. Additional topics include modeling state taxes; social security and pensions; and tax compensation. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

EC 101 and EC 102

Credits:

4

Description:

This course examines regulation and analyzes the structure, conduct, and performance of American industry. Monopoly and strategic behavior in oligopoly and monopolistic competition are considered. U.S. antitrust law and the effect of regulatory laws on industrial performance are explored. Regulatory practices, rate setting, deregulation, public-enterprise pricing, and issues in privatization are examined, with an emphasis on case studies and policy analysis. Normally offered every other year.

Prerequisites:

EC 101 and EC 102

Credits:

4

Description:

This course examines theories of international trade. The policy implications of each theory are explored and the effect of trade on the welfare of the nation is examined. Also the development of trade blocs and the the political economy of trade are studied. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

EC 101 and EC 102

Credits:

4

Description:

The balance of payments and foreign exchange markets and instruments, and the determination of exchange rates. Balance-of-payments adjustments under alternative exchange-rate systems, international liquidity, international economics policy and open economy macroeconomics.

Prerequisites:

EC 101 and EC 102

Credits:

4

Description:

This course introduces students to the foundations of game theory using applications from economics and everyday decision-making. The course examines the common strategic elements of interactions between consumers and producers, governments and citizens, politicians and their constituencies, countries and their trading partners, and various other participants in social relationships. The course provides a theoretical framework for modeling strategic interaction, beginning with the development of the concept of a Nash equilibrium, reputation, signaling, collective-action problems, and voting procedures and strategies. Normally offered every other year.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Politics, Philosophy, & Economics Learning Goals & Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Students will...
Students will be able to...
Understand the relevant theories and concepts of politics, philosophy, and economics
  • Understand the disciplines of government, economics, and philosophy
  • Understand the institutions and rules that govern and structure political decision-making
  • Understand the main theories and concepts of ethics and political philosophy
  • Acquire relevant interdisciplinary skills
  • Have an interdisciplinary perspective, knowledge, and skill set
  • Analyze and critically assess quantitative and qualitative research
  • Access existing economic knowledge and interpret and manipulate economic data
  • Apply the relevant theory and skills to the discussion of social issues
  • Distinguish and identify the ethical, political, and economic aspects of social and political questions and challenges
  • Combine the perspectives, theories, and data from politics, philosophy, and economics to engage in real world social and political issues
  • Apply theory and methods from government, economics, and philosophy to a variety of social and political questions and challenges
  • Honors

    To complete requirements for honors in the major, a candidate must:

    1. Graduate with a major GPA of 3.5 or higher
    2. Graduate with an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher
    3. Complete at least two 400-level courses in Government, Philosophy, and/or Economics. Courses may be from different departments
    4. Complete PPE-H401
    5. Complete a research paper/thesis in PPE-H401 that is approved by the PPE Honors Committee
    6. CAS Honors Program students only: Present work from the senior honors experience at the Honors Symposium or Pecha Kucha event
    7. All other students: Present the research paper/thesis to the PPE Honors Committee

    To become a candidate for honors in the major, a student must:

    1. Have a major GPA of 3.4 or higher
    2. Have an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher
    3. Have completed at least two PPE core requirement courses

    CAS Honors Program students only: CAS Honors Program students who fulfill the above GPA requirement and minimum coursework are assumed to be candidates for departmental honors and should consult with a major advisor during junior year about registering for major honors requirements as described above

    All other students: Apply to the program director at the beginning of junior year and find a thesis supervisor by the end of junior year

    Prerequisites:

    Take PHIL-119 PHIL-120 PHIL-123 or PHIL-127; and 2 of the following courses: GVT-110, GVT-201, GVT-225, EC-101, EC-102, PHIL-212, PHIL-250, STATS-240, STATS-250. PPE Students Only. Senior Status and CAS Honors required.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This interdisciplinary class for students in PPE and the Honors Program brings together the fields of politics, philosophy, and economics at a high academic level. You will be confronted with hard questions about the sources, ends, and limits of government; the usefulness and troubles of free markets; the proper distribution of economic advantages in society; and what works best for building a just and efficient system of economic institutions.

    Politics, Philosophy, & Economics Courses

    Prerequisites:

    PHIL-119, PHIL-120, PHIL-123, or PHIL-127 and 2 of the following courses: GVT-110, GVT-201, GVT-225, EC-101, EC-102, PHIL-212, PHIL-250, STATS-240, STATS-250. PPE students only. Senior status required.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This interdisciplinary class brings together the fields of politics, philosophy, and economics at a high academic level. You will be confronted with hard questions about the sources, ends, and limits of government; the usefulness and troubles of free markets; the proper distribution of economic advantages in society; and what works best for building a just and efficient system of economic institutions.

    Prerequisites:

    Take PHIL-119 PHIL-120 PHIL-123 or PHIL-127; and 2 of the following courses: GVT-110, GVT-201, GVT-225, EC-101, EC-102, PHIL-212, PHIL-250, STATS-240, STATS-250. PPE Students Only. Senior Status and CAS Honors required.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This interdisciplinary class for students in PPE and the Honors Program brings together the fields of politics, philosophy, and economics at a high academic level. You will be confronted with hard questions about the sources, ends, and limits of government; the usefulness and troubles of free markets; the proper distribution of economic advantages in society; and what works best for building a just and efficient system of economic institutions.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Independent Study