Public Service

 

Public Service Minor Requirements

Learn more about this minor

Public Service Minor for Business Students (3 courses, 9 credits)

A student may choose to minor in Public Service by completing three (3) courses, nine (9) credits.

Required Course:

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the field of public management; including government, non-profit, and health. Topics for discussion include the role of managers in publicly controlled bureaucracies, techniques for analyzing and participating in public policy making including decision making, policy formulation, strategic planning, and implementation.

Choose two (2) courses from the following:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will examine social change in the U.S. and abroad. The course will also examine the role of business, nonprofits, and the public sector in addressing social problems. Topics studied may include the Industrial Revolution, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, environmentalism, and the gay and lesbian movement.

Prerequisites:

ACCT 201; ACCT 202; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the fundamentals of budgeting, financial management, and revenue systems in the public sector. Course goals include: A heightened awareness of the democratic ideals and value that must inform budgeting and financial management decisions, including a commitment to ethics, transparency and accountability; an understanding of the budget process and the distinctive features of budgetary decision making in the public sector; an understanding of the critical linkage between budgeting and financial management systems and the capacity of an organization to achieve its strategic goals; the ability to use the budget and financial reports as planning and management tools; knowledge of the basic principles of taxation as well as the structure and functions of federal, state, and local revenue systems. The course emphasizes knowledge and skills essential to the full range of public service careers.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students explore small groups and organizational operations, practices, behaviors, and structure. They develop techniques for maximizing efficiency and/or effectiveness; evaluations analysis; concepts and applications of the Classicists; leadership; organizational development; and results-oriented management; as well as elements of reorganization, innovation, and change.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The primary focus will be on understanding the operational and strategic leadership aspects of managing mission driven, public service organizations. Specific emphasis will be placed on nonprofit corporations, including coursework that explores the legal, structural, and operational issues that are particular to such organizations.

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course demonstrates how issues, problems and questions surrounding public policies, program operations, and administrative systems can be structured as hypotheses and made amendable to resolution through the application of social science research techniques. The elements of research design such as surveys, true experiments, quasi-experiments, case studies and non-experimental studies are described, as well as sampling techniques and descriptive statistics. Ethical issues related to employment of these methods in the policy making process are also explored. The course content is presented as a way to reduce managerial uncertainty regarding alternative courses of action.

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will explore complex issues in public and non-profit human resource management (HRM) by examining policies and practices that support and enhance the value and contribution of individuals in these organizations.

Students may use PAD 201 Social Change as a minor requirement if it has not been counted toward any other BSBA requirement.

Public Service Minor for College of Arts & Sciences Students (3 courses, 9 credits)

College of Arts & Sciences students may undertake a Public Service minor when they have achieved junior standing and have completed:

Required Course:

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the field of public management; including government, non-profit, and health. Topics for discussion include the role of managers in publicly controlled bureaucracies, techniques for analyzing and participating in public policy making including decision making, policy formulation, strategic planning, and implementation.

Choose two (2) courses from the following:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will examine social change in the U.S. and abroad. The course will also examine the role of business, nonprofits, and the public sector in addressing social problems. Topics studied may include the Industrial Revolution, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, environmentalism, and the gay and lesbian movement.

Prerequisites:

ACCT 201; ACCT 202; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the fundamentals of budgeting, financial management, and revenue systems in the public sector. Course goals include: A heightened awareness of the democratic ideals and value that must inform budgeting and financial management decisions, including a commitment to ethics, transparency and accountability; an understanding of the budget process and the distinctive features of budgetary decision making in the public sector; an understanding of the critical linkage between budgeting and financial management systems and the capacity of an organization to achieve its strategic goals; the ability to use the budget and financial reports as planning and management tools; knowledge of the basic principles of taxation as well as the structure and functions of federal, state, and local revenue systems. The course emphasizes knowledge and skills essential to the full range of public service careers.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students explore small groups and organizational operations, practices, behaviors, and structure. They develop techniques for maximizing efficiency and/or effectiveness; evaluations analysis; concepts and applications of the Classicists; leadership; organizational development; and results-oriented management; as well as elements of reorganization, innovation, and change.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The primary focus will be on understanding the operational and strategic leadership aspects of managing mission driven, public service organizations. Specific emphasis will be placed on nonprofit corporations, including coursework that explores the legal, structural, and operational issues that are particular to such organizations.

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course demonstrates how issues, problems and questions surrounding public policies, program operations, and administrative systems can be structured as hypotheses and made amendable to resolution through the application of social science research techniques. The elements of research design such as surveys, true experiments, quasi-experiments, case studies and non-experimental studies are described, as well as sampling techniques and descriptive statistics. Ethical issues related to employment of these methods in the policy making process are also explored. The course content is presented as a way to reduce managerial uncertainty regarding alternative courses of action.

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will explore complex issues in public and non-profit human resource management (HRM) by examining policies and practices that support and enhance the value and contribution of individuals in these organizations.

Accelerated BSBA and MPA with full time study

Public Service minor students may waive up to four (4) courses (12 credits) if accepted into the Suffolk Master of Public Administration (MPA) program. This enables a student to complete both the undergraduate and graduate degrees in only five years of full-time study. In order to waive courses, undergraduates must register for sections cross-listed with graduate level courses and earn a "B" grade or better.

Nonprofit Management Minor

Nonprofit Management Minor for Business Students (3 courses, 9-10 credits)

A student may choose to minor in Nonprofit Management by completing three (3) courses, nine (9-10) credits. 

Required Courses (2 courses, 6 credits)

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The primary focus will be on understanding the operational and strategic leadership aspects of managing mission driven, public service organizations. Specific emphasis will be placed on nonprofit corporations, including coursework that explores the legal, structural, and operational issues that are particular to such organizations.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Juniors and Seniors

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an in-depth look at today's philanthropic trends, patterns, and best practices in fundraising techniques.

Choose one course (3-4 credits) from the following:

Prerequisites:

ACCT 331

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Studies accounting principles, unique financial reporting (such as fund accounting), and budgetary control in government agencies and charitable, healthcare, educational, and other not-for-profit organizations.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Business ethics is applied ethics. Explores the roles and responsibilities of business in a global society. Teaches models of ethical decision-making that incorporate multiple points of view, including diverse cultural worldviews and legal perspectives. Addresses factors that contribute to and constrain ethical behavior in and by organizations. Students apply concepts to current business problems, such as anti-trust, accounting fraud, deceptive advertising, and environmental dumping.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and ENT-309, Junior standing or higher, and instructor permission.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

As nascent entrepreneurs how can you start or grow your business when you are undercapitalized while at the same time building brand awareness? One potential source of capital that allows for additional value creation (i.e., building a customer base and brand ambassadors) is crowdfunding. This course will examine, factors that lead to crowdfunding success during the creation (e.g., the idea, the pitch, the prototype, etc.) and maintenance (e.g., social presence) of a crowdfunding campaign as well as the execution of any promised deliverable. Focusing on an experiential process this course will guide student teams though the creation and execution of their own live crowdfunding campaign.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Social entrepreneurs are people who harness their energy, talent and commitment to make the world a more humane, safe and just place. This is accomplished by applying vision, passion, persistence and leadership to the creation of businesses that are focused on a mission of social responsibility. While the social mission is important, so is the fact that the business funding the mission must be sustainable via revenue generation, market need, and operational efficiency. Creating balance between business effectiveness and serving the needs of the community the business is dedicate to helping, provides a unique challenge to social entrepreneurship to stay entrepreneurial in terms of the business model, thus providing the necessary resources to the social mission.

Prerequisites:

GVT 110 or instructor's permission

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the process and politics of agenda-setting and public policy formulation in the United States. The primary focus is on understanding the complex interaction between institutions and actors involved in public policy making at the federal level, although many of these observations are transferrable to other levels of government (state and local) and other political systems. Students will learn by doing as they become elected Members of Congress in a semester-long legislative simulation. Normally offered every fall.

Prerequisites:

Junior status or higher

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course introduces the concept and practices of transitional justice, which addresses current and past human rights violations. We review the various mechanisms of transitional justice, including: criminal prosecution; lustrations; truth and reconciliation commissions; reparations; and apologies. Our focus will be on understanding the nature of the political and moral dilemmas encountered by countries that consider and apply these mechanisms. We will consider broad theoretical questions as well as specific examples (e.g., Germany after the Holocaust; The South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission; The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda). The course will also emphasize the practical implications of transitional justice: how do we empirically measure the effects of transitional justice; what is the role of traditional mechanisms of justice; how does one balance between the global human rights regime and local realities; what is the relationship between gender and religion and transitional justice; and, what is the role of transitional justice mechanisms in conflict resolution.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the key concepts and current practices of public history as an academic discipline and professional field in museums, libraries, archives, historical societies, historic houses, and preservation organizations. Examines the presentation and interpretation of history to popular audiences through documentaries, motion pictures, Web sites, and other forms of media. Topics covered will include curation, conservation, fundraising, educational and interpretive programming. Students will gain practical experience by participating in substantive, directed projects with partnering organizations.

Prerequisites:

MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Change is constant in all industries and work settings. Accordingly there is constant demand for people who can understand the need for change, make complex, strategic and realistic change plans, and lead others through a successful implementation of a planned change. This lively case-based course will focus on managerial and leadership skill-building in the areas of change management through the careful and thorough analysis of change-focused case studies. Students will be expected to conduct both individual and group-based analyses of complex business cases; including the preparation of written case analyses, active participation in case discussions, and delivery of case analyses through oral presentation.

Prerequisites:

MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is premised on the fact that whereas a manager needs analytical skills to discover optimal solutions to business problems, a broad array of negotiation skills is needed to implement these solutions. This experiential course is designed to improve your skills in all phases of negotiation: understanding prescriptive and descriptive negotiation theory as it applies to dyadic and multiparty negotiations, to buyer-seller transactions and the resolution of disputes, to the development of negotiation strategy, and to the management of integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process. The course is based on a series of simulated negotiations in a variety of contexts including one-on-one, multi-party, cross-cultural, third-party and team negotiations. Please note that given the experiential nature of the course, attendance is mandatory and will be strictly enforced beginning from the first class session.

Prerequisites:

MKT 210 or MKT-H210

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course presents the principles of marketing, marketing strategy, and the marketing mix as applicable in a nonprofit settings. This course is directed toward specific Customer Service Marketing applications that have focused relevance to non-profit organizations. Special attention is given to marketing of services, customer service, development of marketing strategies, and sales to targeted markets. This course is designed to provide students with insight into the nuances associated with marketing activities design to support the efforts of Nonprofit Organizations' attempts to influence clients, constituents, volunteers, Board members and donors.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is first descriptive, characterizing the nature of participants in the American intergovernmental and intersectoral systems. It is also theoretical, looking at the ways that interactive policy networks function and how participants behave. It is practical through a focus on techniques that public managers use within these networked systems. Case studies across a range of policy areas are used to build critical thinking and practical abilities within the realm of public management across many types of boundary in public governance systems.

Prerequisites:

Junior status or above

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to build financial management skills for students who wish to start or advance nonprofit management careers and for students who are likely to interact with nonprofits, through grants, contracts, or partnerships. The course focuses on the effective allocation of resources to programs which, in turn, have been designed to achieve the strategic goals of a nonprofit organization. From this point of view, financial management is not a disconnected management function, but an integral part of what managers do to fulfill as nonprofit organization's mission. Basic financial management knowledge and skills - including financial analysis, budgeting, full-cost accounting, pricing services, performance measurement, control of operations and financial reporting are taught within the context of the organization's strategic goals.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Juniors and Seniors

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Course covers both Grant seeking and Grant writing. Students, individually, but most often in teams, work with a nonprofit or government organization to develop a project idea and prepare a Master Grant Proposal and a Grant Application to be submitted to a most-likely-to-fund Grand maker. Classes focus on step-by-step Grant writing & Grant seeking process, and the instructor also consults with student-Grant writers individually an via Blackboard.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Public Service Internship provides work experience for minors; allowing them to bridge the gap between education and practice. It includes approximately 150 hours of work in a government, non-profit, or health care organization on a specific project of importance to the host organization.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Considers the reciprocal relationship between individuals and their social context and explores the strength-based, systems-oriented, and socially responsible methods that community psychologists use in their work with underserved communities. Uses service-learning to connect knowledge and theory acquired through weekly lectures and discussions on key concepts in community psychology with reflective practice. Specifically, in addition to scheduled class meetings students are required to complete five hours a week (60 hours total) of community service.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Enables students to examine, as well as develop an awareness and appreciation of, diversity within today's society. Providing an overview of the major racial, ethnic, and cultural groups in the U.S., the focus is on the ways in which cultural awareness enhances professional helping relationships and improves the operation of human services systems.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The expansive world of arts administration provides a wealth of rewarding career opportunities. This course will provide a fundamental overview of the managing, marketing, fundraising, and financial management functions of the performing and visual arts organizations. Using Suffolk's Modern Theatre as a laboratory, as well as site visits to some of Boston's greatest arts and culture institutions, we will investigate real world successes and challenges and discover what special talents each individual student can bring to the management mix. This course is a core requirement for Suffolk's new interdisciplinary Arts Administration minor.

Courses may not be double counted toward multiple minor and/or major selections. 

ACCT 415, ENT 340, ENT 350,  MGT 301, MGT 401, MKT 436 have prerequisites; please discuss with Professor Brendan Burke, the Nonprofit Management Advisor, to include them in your curriculum planning. 

Nonprofit Management Minor for College of Arts and Sciences Students (5 courses, 15-18 credits)

A student may choose to minor in Nonprofit Management by completing five (5) courses, fifteen to eighteen (15-18) credits. 

Required Courses (2 courses, 6 credits)

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The primary focus will be on understanding the operational and strategic leadership aspects of managing mission driven, public service organizations. Specific emphasis will be placed on nonprofit corporations, including coursework that explores the legal, structural, and operational issues that are particular to such organizations.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Juniors and Seniors

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an in-depth look at today's philanthropic trends, patterns, and best practices in fundraising techniques.

Courses may not be double counted toward multiple minor and/or major selections.

ACCT 415, ENT 340, ENT 350, MGT 301, MGT 401, MGT 436 have prerequisites; please discuss with Professor Brendan Burke, the Nonprofit Management Minor Advisor, to include them in your curriculum planning. 

Choose three courses (9-12 credits) from the following:

Prerequisites:

ACCT 331

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Studies accounting principles, unique financial reporting (such as fund accounting), and budgetary control in government agencies and charitable, healthcare, educational, and other not-for-profit organizations.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Business ethics is applied ethics. Explores the roles and responsibilities of business in a global society. Teaches models of ethical decision-making that incorporate multiple points of view, including diverse cultural worldviews and legal perspectives. Addresses factors that contribute to and constrain ethical behavior in and by organizations. Students apply concepts to current business problems, such as anti-trust, accounting fraud, deceptive advertising, and environmental dumping.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and ENT-309, Junior standing or higher, and instructor permission.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

As nascent entrepreneurs how can you start or grow your business when you are undercapitalized while at the same time building brand awareness? One potential source of capital that allows for additional value creation (i.e., building a customer base and brand ambassadors) is crowdfunding. This course will examine, factors that lead to crowdfunding success during the creation (e.g., the idea, the pitch, the prototype, etc.) and maintenance (e.g., social presence) of a crowdfunding campaign as well as the execution of any promised deliverable. Focusing on an experiential process this course will guide student teams though the creation and execution of their own live crowdfunding campaign.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Social entrepreneurs are people who harness their energy, talent and commitment to make the world a more humane, safe and just place. This is accomplished by applying vision, passion, persistence and leadership to the creation of businesses that are focused on a mission of social responsibility. While the social mission is important, so is the fact that the business funding the mission must be sustainable via revenue generation, market need, and operational efficiency. Creating balance between business effectiveness and serving the needs of the community the business is dedicate to helping, provides a unique challenge to social entrepreneurship to stay entrepreneurial in terms of the business model, thus providing the necessary resources to the social mission.

Prerequisites:

GVT 110 or instructor's permission

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the process and politics of agenda-setting and public policy formulation in the United States. The primary focus is on understanding the complex interaction between institutions and actors involved in public policy making at the federal level, although many of these observations are transferrable to other levels of government (state and local) and other political systems. Students will learn by doing as they become elected Members of Congress in a semester-long legislative simulation. Normally offered every fall.

Prerequisites:

Junior status or higher

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course introduces the concept and practices of transitional justice, which addresses current and past human rights violations. We review the various mechanisms of transitional justice, including: criminal prosecution; lustrations; truth and reconciliation commissions; reparations; and apologies. Our focus will be on understanding the nature of the political and moral dilemmas encountered by countries that consider and apply these mechanisms. We will consider broad theoretical questions as well as specific examples (e.g., Germany after the Holocaust; The South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission; The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda). The course will also emphasize the practical implications of transitional justice: how do we empirically measure the effects of transitional justice; what is the role of traditional mechanisms of justice; how does one balance between the global human rights regime and local realities; what is the relationship between gender and religion and transitional justice; and, what is the role of transitional justice mechanisms in conflict resolution.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the key concepts and current practices of public history as an academic discipline and professional field in museums, libraries, archives, historical societies, historic houses, and preservation organizations. Examines the presentation and interpretation of history to popular audiences through documentaries, motion pictures, Web sites, and other forms of media. Topics covered will include curation, conservation, fundraising, educational and interpretive programming. Students will gain practical experience by participating in substantive, directed projects with partnering organizations.

Prerequisites:

MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Change is constant in all industries and work settings. Accordingly there is constant demand for people who can understand the need for change, make complex, strategic and realistic change plans, and lead others through a successful implementation of a planned change. This lively case-based course will focus on managerial and leadership skill-building in the areas of change management through the careful and thorough analysis of change-focused case studies. Students will be expected to conduct both individual and group-based analyses of complex business cases; including the preparation of written case analyses, active participation in case discussions, and delivery of case analyses through oral presentation.

Prerequisites:

MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is premised on the fact that whereas a manager needs analytical skills to discover optimal solutions to business problems, a broad array of negotiation skills is needed to implement these solutions. This experiential course is designed to improve your skills in all phases of negotiation: understanding prescriptive and descriptive negotiation theory as it applies to dyadic and multiparty negotiations, to buyer-seller transactions and the resolution of disputes, to the development of negotiation strategy, and to the management of integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process. The course is based on a series of simulated negotiations in a variety of contexts including one-on-one, multi-party, cross-cultural, third-party and team negotiations. Please note that given the experiential nature of the course, attendance is mandatory and will be strictly enforced beginning from the first class session.

Prerequisites:

MKT 210 or MKT-H210

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course presents the principles of marketing, marketing strategy, and the marketing mix as applicable in a nonprofit settings. This course is directed toward specific Customer Service Marketing applications that have focused relevance to non-profit organizations. Special attention is given to marketing of services, customer service, development of marketing strategies, and sales to targeted markets. This course is designed to provide students with insight into the nuances associated with marketing activities design to support the efforts of Nonprofit Organizations' attempts to influence clients, constituents, volunteers, Board members and donors.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is first descriptive, characterizing the nature of participants in the American intergovernmental and intersectoral systems. It is also theoretical, looking at the ways that interactive policy networks function and how participants behave. It is practical through a focus on techniques that public managers use within these networked systems. Case studies across a range of policy areas are used to build critical thinking and practical abilities within the realm of public management across many types of boundary in public governance systems.

Prerequisites:

Junior status or above

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to build financial management skills for students who wish to start or advance nonprofit management careers and for students who are likely to interact with nonprofits, through grants, contracts, or partnerships. The course focuses on the effective allocation of resources to programs which, in turn, have been designed to achieve the strategic goals of a nonprofit organization. From this point of view, financial management is not a disconnected management function, but an integral part of what managers do to fulfill as nonprofit organization's mission. Basic financial management knowledge and skills - including financial analysis, budgeting, full-cost accounting, pricing services, performance measurement, control of operations and financial reporting are taught within the context of the organization's strategic goals.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Juniors and Seniors

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Course covers both Grant seeking and Grant writing. Students, individually, but most often in teams, work with a nonprofit or government organization to develop a project idea and prepare a Master Grant Proposal and a Grant Application to be submitted to a most-likely-to-fund Grand maker. Classes focus on step-by-step Grant writing & Grant seeking process, and the instructor also consults with student-Grant writers individually an via Blackboard.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Public Service Internship provides work experience for minors; allowing them to bridge the gap between education and practice. It includes approximately 150 hours of work in a government, non-profit, or health care organization on a specific project of importance to the host organization.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Considers the reciprocal relationship between individuals and their social context and explores the strength-based, systems-oriented, and socially responsible methods that community psychologists use in their work with underserved communities. Uses service-learning to connect knowledge and theory acquired through weekly lectures and discussions on key concepts in community psychology with reflective practice. Specifically, in addition to scheduled class meetings students are required to complete five hours a week (60 hours total) of community service.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Enables students to examine, as well as develop an awareness and appreciation of, diversity within today's society. Providing an overview of the major racial, ethnic, and cultural groups in the U.S., the focus is on the ways in which cultural awareness enhances professional helping relationships and improves the operation of human services systems.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The expansive world of arts administration provides a wealth of rewarding career opportunities. This course will provide a fundamental overview of the managing, marketing, fundraising, and financial management functions of the performing and visual arts organizations. Using Suffolk's Modern Theatre as a laboratory, as well as site visits to some of Boston's greatest arts and culture institutions, we will investigate real world successes and challenges and discover what special talents each individual student can bring to the management mix. This course is a core requirement for Suffolk's new interdisciplinary Arts Administration minor.

Public Service Undergraduate Courses

Undergraduate Courses

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will examine social change in the U.S. and abroad. The course will also examine the role of business, nonprofits, and the public sector in addressing social problems. Topics studied may include the Industrial Revolution, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, environmentalism, and the gay and lesbian movement.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will examine social change in the U.S. and abroad. The course will also examine the role of business, nonprofits, and the public sector in addressing social problems. Topics studied may include the Industrial Revolution, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, environmentalism, and the gay and lesbian movement.

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the field of public management; including government, non-profit, and health. Topics for discussion include the role of managers in publicly controlled bureaucracies, techniques for analyzing and participating in public policy making including decision making, policy formulation, strategic planning, and implementation.

Prerequisites:

ACCT 201; ACCT 202; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the fundamentals of budgeting, financial management, and revenue systems in the public sector. Course goals include: A heightened awareness of the democratic ideals and value that must inform budgeting and financial management decisions, including a commitment to ethics, transparency and accountability; an understanding of the budget process and the distinctive features of budgetary decision making in the public sector; an understanding of the critical linkage between budgeting and financial management systems and the capacity of an organization to achieve its strategic goals; the ability to use the budget and financial reports as planning and management tools; knowledge of the basic principles of taxation as well as the structure and functions of federal, state, and local revenue systems. The course emphasizes knowledge and skills essential to the full range of public service careers.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students explore small groups and organizational operations, practices, behaviors, and structure. They develop techniques for maximizing efficiency and/or effectiveness; evaluations analysis; concepts and applications of the Classicists; leadership; organizational development; and results-oriented management; as well as elements of reorganization, innovation, and change.

Prerequisites:

MATH 128 or higher; STATS 240 or STATS 250; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Quantitative analysis introduces basic statistical techniques used to analyze and draw conclusions from citizen and client surveys; program and policy evaluations; and performance and operations data. These techniques include chi square, lambda, gamma, correlations, analysis of variance, t test correlation, and multivariate regression. Knowledge of these statistical techniques empowers managers by giving them the ability to evaluate the work of consultants, access the policy and management of literature, and analyze data using the analytical tools available in commonly used statistical software, such as Microsoft Excel and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

Prerequisites:

BLE 214 or GVT 110; Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students review the basis for administrative practice. They learn legal interpretation of statutes, regulations, and proposed legislation that impact public administration and public policy.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The primary focus will be on understanding the operational and strategic leadership aspects of managing mission driven, public service organizations. Specific emphasis will be placed on nonprofit corporations, including coursework that explores the legal, structural, and operational issues that are particular to such organizations.

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course demonstrates how issues, problems and questions surrounding public policies, program operations, and administrative systems can be structured as hypotheses and made amendable to resolution through the application of social science research techniques. The elements of research design such as surveys, true experiments, quasi-experiments, case studies and non-experimental studies are described, as well as sampling techniques and descriptive statistics. Ethical issues related to employment of these methods in the policy making process are also explored. The course content is presented as a way to reduce managerial uncertainty regarding alternative courses of action.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is first descriptive, characterizing the nature of participants in the American intergovernmental and intersectoral systems. It is also theoretical, looking at the ways that interactive policy networks function and how participants behave. It is practical through a focus on techniques that public managers use within these networked systems. Case studies across a range of policy areas are used to build critical thinking and practical abilities within the realm of public management across many types of boundary in public governance systems.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Juniors and Seniors

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an in-depth look at today's philanthropic trends, patterns, and best practices in fundraising techniques.

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will explore complex issues in public and non-profit human resource management (HRM) by examining policies and practices that support and enhance the value and contribution of individuals in these organizations.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Public Service Internship provides work experience for minors; allowing them to bridge the gap between education and practice. It includes approximately 150 hours of work in a government, non-profit, or health care organization on a specific project of importance to the host organization.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing, instructor's consent

Credits:

1.00- 6.00

Description:

Independent study allows students to expand their classroom experience by completing research in an area of interest not already covered by Suffolk courses. The student designs a unique project and finds a full-time faculty member with expertise in that topic who agrees to sponsor it and provide feedback as the proposal is refined. A well designed and executed research project broadens and/or deepens learning in a major or minor area of study and may also enhance a student's marketability to potential future employers. Students cannot register for an Independent Study until a full proposal is approved by the faculty sponsor, department chair, and academic dean. Many Independent study proposals require revisions before approval is granted; even with revisions independent study approval is NOT guaranteed. Students are strongly encouraged to submit a proposal in enough time to register for a different course if the proposal is not accepted. For complete instructions, see the SBS Independent/Directed Study Agreement and Proposal form available online.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Business leaders who wish to climb to the top of their companies need to have developed a "philanthropic resume" along the way. Serving on nonprofit Boards of Directors is one way to develop that resume. Learn about what nonprofit organizations do, what role the Board of Directors plays in their operation, and what your responsibilities would be as a member of their Board.