Public Service

The Suffolk University Institute for Public Service (IPS) advances the public service mission of the Sawyer Business School. We support social responsibility and collaboration for the common good and seek to foster a public service spirit. For future leaders in government, health, nonprofit, and business organizations, we offer curriculum options designed to enhance the responsiveness, efficiency, and effectiveness of the operations and interactions of all the public service sectors. We adhere to the democratic values of inclusion, egalitarianism, and respect for diversity.

A minor in public service is interdisciplinary, drawing upon the behavioral, social science, quantitative, administrative/management science, and related liberal arts disciplines. The Suffolk minor in Public Service prepares students for professional careers in all levels of government and the nonprofit sector, focusing on the knowledge and skills needed to become an effective manager and leader in the challenging environment of public service.

A close relationship exists between the undergraduate minor in public service and the Suffolk Master of Public Administration (MPA) and provides a strong foundation for pursuing graduate education in public service.

Course descriptions may be updated periodically to reflect changes since the last published catalog.

Public Service Minor

Learn more about this minor

Public Service Minor for Business Students (3 courses, 9 credits)

A student may choose to minor in Public Service by completing three (3) courses, nine (9) credits.

Required course:

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the field of public management; including government, non-profit, and health. Topics for discussion include the role of managers in publicly controlled bureaucracies, techniques for analyzing and participating in public policy making including decision making, policy formulation, strategic planning, and implementation.

Choose two (2) courses from the following:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will examine social change in the U.S. and abroad. The course will also examine the role of business, nonprofits, and the public sector in addressing social problems. Topics studied may include the Industrial Revolution, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, environmentalism, and the gay and lesbian movement.

Prerequisites:

ACCT 201; ACCT 202; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the fundamentals of budgeting, financial management, and revenue systems in the public sector. Course goals include: A heightened awareness of the democratic ideals and value that must inform budgeting and financial management decisions, including a commitment to ethics, transparency and accountability; an understanding of the budget process and the distinctive features of budgetary decision making in the public sector; an understanding of the critical linkage between budgeting and financial management systems and the capacity of an organization to achieve its strategic goals; the ability to use the budget and financial reports as planning and management tools; knowledge of the basic principles of taxation as well as the structure and functions of federal, state, and local revenue systems. The course emphasizes knowledge and skills essential to the full range of public service careers.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students explore small groups and organizational operations, practices, behaviors, and structure. They develop techniques for maximizing efficiency and/or effectiveness; evaluations analysis; concepts and applications of the Classicists; leadership; organizational development; and results-oriented management; as well as elements of reorganization, innovation, and change.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The primary focus will be on understanding the operational and strategic leadership aspects of managing mission driven, public service organizations. Specific emphasis will be placed on nonprofit corporations, including coursework that explores the legal, structural, and operational issues that are particular to such organizations.

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course demonstrates how issues, problems and questions surrounding public policies, program operations, and administrative systems can be structured as hypotheses and made amendable to resolution through the application of social science research techniques. The elements of research design such as surveys, true experiments, quasi-experiments, case studies and non-experimental studies are described, as well as sampling techniques and descriptive statistics. Ethical issues related to employment of these methods in the policy making process are also explored. The course content is presented as a way to reduce managerial uncertainty regarding alternative courses of action.

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will explore complex issues in public and non-profit human resource management (HRM) by examining policies and practices that support and enhance the value and contribution of individuals in these organizations.

Students may use PAD 201 Social Change as a minor requirement if it has not been counted toward any other BSBA requirement.

Public Service Minor for College of Arts & Sciences Students (3 courses, 9 credits)

College of Arts & Sciences students may undertake a public service minor when they have achieved junior standing and have completed:

Required course:

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the field of public management; including government, non-profit, and health. Topics for discussion include the role of managers in publicly controlled bureaucracies, techniques for analyzing and participating in public policy making including decision making, policy formulation, strategic planning, and implementation.

Choose tow (2) courses from the following:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will examine social change in the U.S. and abroad. The course will also examine the role of business, nonprofits, and the public sector in addressing social problems. Topics studied may include the Industrial Revolution, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, environmentalism, and the gay and lesbian movement.

Prerequisites:

ACCT 201; ACCT 202; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the fundamentals of budgeting, financial management, and revenue systems in the public sector. Course goals include: A heightened awareness of the democratic ideals and value that must inform budgeting and financial management decisions, including a commitment to ethics, transparency and accountability; an understanding of the budget process and the distinctive features of budgetary decision making in the public sector; an understanding of the critical linkage between budgeting and financial management systems and the capacity of an organization to achieve its strategic goals; the ability to use the budget and financial reports as planning and management tools; knowledge of the basic principles of taxation as well as the structure and functions of federal, state, and local revenue systems. The course emphasizes knowledge and skills essential to the full range of public service careers.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students explore small groups and organizational operations, practices, behaviors, and structure. They develop techniques for maximizing efficiency and/or effectiveness; evaluations analysis; concepts and applications of the Classicists; leadership; organizational development; and results-oriented management; as well as elements of reorganization, innovation, and change.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The primary focus will be on understanding the operational and strategic leadership aspects of managing mission driven, public service organizations. Specific emphasis will be placed on nonprofit corporations, including coursework that explores the legal, structural, and operational issues that are particular to such organizations.

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course demonstrates how issues, problems and questions surrounding public policies, program operations, and administrative systems can be structured as hypotheses and made amendable to resolution through the application of social science research techniques. The elements of research design such as surveys, true experiments, quasi-experiments, case studies and non-experimental studies are described, as well as sampling techniques and descriptive statistics. Ethical issues related to employment of these methods in the policy making process are also explored. The course content is presented as a way to reduce managerial uncertainty regarding alternative courses of action.

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will explore complex issues in public and non-profit human resource management (HRM) by examining policies and practices that support and enhance the value and contribution of individuals in these organizations.

Accelerated BSBA (full-time study)

Public service minor students may waive up to four (4) courses (12 credits) if accepted into the Suffolk Master of Public Administration (MPA) program. This enables a student to complete both the undergraduate and graduate degrees in only five years of full-time study. In order to waive courses, undergraduates must register for sections cross-listed with graduate level courses and earn a "B" grade or better.

Public Service Undergraduate Courses

Undergraduate Courses

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will examine social change in the U.S. and abroad. The course will also examine the role of business, nonprofits, and the public sector in addressing social problems. Topics studied may include the Industrial Revolution, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, environmentalism, and the gay and lesbian movement.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will examine social change in the U.S. and abroad. The course will also examine the role of business, nonprofits, and the public sector in addressing social problems. Topics studied may include the Industrial Revolution, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, environmentalism, and the gay and lesbian movement.

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the field of public management; including government, non-profit, and health. Topics for discussion include the role of managers in publicly controlled bureaucracies, techniques for analyzing and participating in public policy making including decision making, policy formulation, strategic planning, and implementation.

Prerequisites:

ACCT 201; ACCT 202; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the fundamentals of budgeting, financial management, and revenue systems in the public sector. Course goals include: A heightened awareness of the democratic ideals and value that must inform budgeting and financial management decisions, including a commitment to ethics, transparency and accountability; an understanding of the budget process and the distinctive features of budgetary decision making in the public sector; an understanding of the critical linkage between budgeting and financial management systems and the capacity of an organization to achieve its strategic goals; the ability to use the budget and financial reports as planning and management tools; knowledge of the basic principles of taxation as well as the structure and functions of federal, state, and local revenue systems. The course emphasizes knowledge and skills essential to the full range of public service careers.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students explore small groups and organizational operations, practices, behaviors, and structure. They develop techniques for maximizing efficiency and/or effectiveness; evaluations analysis; concepts and applications of the Classicists; leadership; organizational development; and results-oriented management; as well as elements of reorganization, innovation, and change.

Prerequisites:

MATH 128 or higher; STATS 240 or STATS 250; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Quantitative analysis introduces basic statistical techniques used to analyze and draw conclusions from citizen and client surveys; program and policy evaluations; and performance and operations data. These techniques include chi square, lambda, gamma, correlations, analysis of variance, t test correlation, and multivariate regression. Knowledge of these statistical techniques empowers managers by giving them the ability to evaluate the work of consultants, access the policy and management of literature, and analyze data using the analytical tools available in commonly used statistical software, such as Microsoft Excel and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

Prerequisites:

BLE 214 or GVT 110; Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students review the basis for administrative practice. They learn legal interpretation of statutes, regulations, and proposed legislation that impact public administration and public policy.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The primary focus will be on understanding the operational and strategic leadership aspects of managing mission driven, public service organizations. Specific emphasis will be placed on nonprofit corporations, including coursework that explores the legal, structural, and operational issues that are particular to such organizations.

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course demonstrates how issues, problems and questions surrounding public policies, program operations, and administrative systems can be structured as hypotheses and made amendable to resolution through the application of social science research techniques. The elements of research design such as surveys, true experiments, quasi-experiments, case studies and non-experimental studies are described, as well as sampling techniques and descriptive statistics. Ethical issues related to employment of these methods in the policy making process are also explored. The course content is presented as a way to reduce managerial uncertainty regarding alternative courses of action.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is first descriptive, characterizing the nature of participants in the American intergovernmental and intersectoral systems. It is also theoretical, looking at the ways that interactive policy networks function and how participants behave. It is practical through a focus on techniques that public managers use within these networked systems. Case studies across a range of policy areas are used to build critical thinking and practical abilities within the realm of public management across many types of boundary in public governance systems.

Prerequisites:

Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will explore complex issues in public and non-profit human resource management (HRM) by examining policies and practices that support and enhance the value and contribution of individuals in these organizations.

Prerequisites:

SIB 101 or HST 149 or HST 150 or Instructor permission

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Global health, global poverty, and global warming are three interrelated issues that are creating a "perfect storm" of crises worldwide with major impacts on the United States. This course is an overview of the problems - the needs, systems, programs, and financing. We will look critically at policies in these areas and discuss what needs to be done to address them. Students will write a major paper on an issue of their choice.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Public Service Internship provides work experience for minors; allowing them to bridge the gap between education and practice. It includes approximately 150 hours of work in a government, non-profit, or health care organization on a specific project of importance to the host organization.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing, instructor's consent

Credits:

1.00- 6.00

Description:

Independent study allows students to expand their classroom experience by completing research in an area of interest not already covered by Suffolk courses. The student designs a unique project and finds a full-time faculty member with expertise in that topic who agrees to sponsor it and provide feedback as the proposal is refined. A well designed and executed research project broadens and/or deepens learning in a major or minor area of study and may also enhance a student's marketability to potential future employers. Students cannot register for an Independent Study until a full proposal is approved by the faculty sponsor, department chair, and academic dean. Many Independent study proposals require revisions before approval is granted; even with revisions independent study approval is NOT guaranteed. Students are strongly encouraged to submit a proposal in enough time to register for a different course if the proposal is not accepted. For complete instructions, see the SBS Independent/Directed Study Agreement and Proposal form available online.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Business leaders who wish to climb to the top of their companies need to have developed a "philanthropic resume" along the way. Serving on nonprofit Boards of Directors is one way to develop that resume. Learn about what nonprofit organizations do, what role the Board of Directors plays in their operation, and what your responsibilities would be as a member of their Board.