Religious Studies

Religious Studies Minor

Learn more about this minor

There is no major available in Religious Studies.

Minor Requirements: 5 courses, 20 credits

Core Requirement (1 Course, 4 Credits)

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will explore the comparative history and structure of Western religious traditions, broadly understood, and their impact on other world religions, while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Traditions to be studied include Greek and Roman religion, the monotheistic faiths (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as Zoroastrianism, Sikhism and Bahaism). We will also explore the impact of the Western religions on indigenous traditions, such as African religion, Native American religion, and Pacific Island religion. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will examine a variety of Eastern religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shintoism. Possible connections to be explored will be the impact of these traditions on others, such as Pacific Islands and African religion, as well as the growing place of Eastern religion in the West. This course will explore the history and structure of each tradition, while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. Normally offered every year. Cultural Diversity B

Electives (4 Courses, 16 Credits)

Choose four of the following:

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4

Description:

Ancient Greek and Roman myths, their motifs, themes and interpretations. Normally offered every third year.

Credits:

4

Description:

"This course explores the relationship between politics & religion in the United States. How and why does religion influence politics in the U.S? What does freedom of religion mean in the U.S.? Why do some groups today erroneously claim that the U.S. was founded as a ""Christian nation""? This course also examines what major world religions say about the status and responsibilities of the state and the roles that minority religious groups (Buddhism\"

Credits:

4

Description:

The exposition and critical evaluation of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Islam. Special attention is given to foundation principles as well as to the similarities and differences of each of these philosophies to basic ideas in Western philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

Credits:

4

Description:

An historical survey of Buddhist philosophy. We will explore Buddhist origins, central teachings, devotional and meditational practices, ritual and institutions as developed from classical to modern times. Special attention given to the philosophical diversity of the Buddhist world view. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is an examination of Native American (Indian) religious experience," both the similarities and differences among the myths and rituals of the major tribes which comprise the background of our nation's history of Western migration and ""settlement."" The emphasis will be on understanding how life was experienced by these peoples through a close look at the philosophical meanings of their mythology and ethics. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C a"

Credits:

4

Description:

An exploration into the various dimensions and ideologies concerning the role of the feminine in relation to the Divine. Belief systems, myths and archetypes from ancient Goddess worship to 20th century feminist theology will be examined in terms of the philosophical content and psychological consequences. Special emphasis will be placed on feminist metaphysical structures for understanding consciousness and Reality. Classes will be conducted by means of lectures, primary and secondary texts and class discussions. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity A

Credits:

4

Description:

A survey of the main developments in Chinese Philosophy. The course begins with the early dynastic concept of humanism and then turns to Confucius and Mencius. Having developed the central Confucian doctrines, students next examine the Taoist response to Confucianism in the writings of Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu. The course then considers Zen Buddhism, which is called Ch'an Buddhism in China, where it originated. In particular, students study the concept of sudden enlightenment before turning to the Neo-Confucian scholars.

Prerequisites:

One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course explores indigenous African systems of thought, modern academic African philosophy, African social and political theory, and contemporary debates centered on questions of identity, modernity, essentialism and historicity within the African context. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every third year. C b

Credits:

4

Description:

Traces the evolution of Judaism, Christianity and Islam to the High Middle Ages to explore the role of Neo-Platonism and Aristotelianism in clarifying and explaining dogma. Particular attention will be paid to ideas about the ways of knowing and rational proofs of God's existence in Philo of Alexandria, Augustine, Anselm, Ibn Rushd (Averroes), Aquinas and Maimonides. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered in alternate years.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Students meet with a department member to pursue advanced studies in areas of particular interest to them.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major or double major combination to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

Religious Studies Courses

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will explore the comparative history and structure of Western religious traditions, broadly understood, and their impact on other world religions, while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Traditions to be studied include Greek and Roman religion, the monotheistic faiths (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as Zoroastrianism, Sikhism and Bahaism). We will also explore the impact of the Western religions on indigenous traditions, such as African religion, Native American religion, and Pacific Island religion. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will examine a variety of Eastern religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shintoism. Possible connections to be explored will be the impact of these traditions on others, such as Pacific Islands and African religion, as well as the growing place of Eastern religion in the West. This course will explore the history and structure of each tradition, while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. Normally offered every year. Cultural Diversity B

Credits:

4

Description:

Traces the evolution of Judaism, Christianity and Islam to the High Middle Ages to explore the role of Neo-Platonism and Aristotelianism in clarifying and explaining dogma. Particular attention will be paid to ideas about the ways of knowing and rational proofs of God's existence in Philo of Alexandria, Augustine, Anselm, Ibn Rushd (Averroes), Aquinas and Maimonides. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered in alternate years.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Students meet with a department member to pursue advanced studies in areas of particular interest to them.