Sociology

Sociology Major

Learn more about this major

Degree Requirements - 126 credits

Students can earn a bachelor of arts degree with this major.  See the requirements for the bachelor of arts degree.

Students can earn a bachelor of science degree with this major.  See the requirements for the bachelor of science degree.

Major Requirements: 10 courses, 37 credits

Core Requirements (5 courses, 17 credits)

Prerequisites:

CAS-101. CAS students only. SBS students by special permission. Restricted to the following majors: Art History, Asian Studies, Biology, Criminal Justice, Economics, English, French, Global Cultural Studies, History, Humanities, International Economics, Music History, Philosophy, Physics, Radiation Science, Socioloug, Spanish, and Undeclared. Instructor consent required for all other majors.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course engages students in the early stages of career planning. Students will explore their interests skills values and strengths which will allow them to begin setting appropriate goals for professional development. Once students understand themselves in relation to the world of work they will learn how to research careers and employment paths that fit with their goals.

Prerequisites:

SOC-113 or SOC-116 with "C" or better & one other SOC course. Cannot be taken concurrently with SOC-310, SOC-315, or SOC-333.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

How sociologists decide what to study how they select a research design sample and collect data analyze results interpret findings and write up reports. Students are introduced to the techniques most frequently used by sociologists and undertake their own small research project. Required for all Sociology majors.

Prerequisites:

SOC-113 or 116 with a grade of "C" or better and one other SOC course. Cannot be taken concurrently with SOC-214.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination and comparison of the origin development and structure of the major theoretical approaches in contemporary sociology. Contributions of different branches of sociology to theory are explored with special attention to the relevance of sociological explanations for society and the social process. Students must have taken SOC 113 or SOC 116 and passed with a "C" or better and one other course from the sociology department. Normally offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

SOC-113 or SOC-116 (with a grade of "C" or better) SOC-214, and SOC-315 or SOC-333. Seniors only. Required of all majors.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores topics in sociology that require students to synthesize and analyze their accumulated sociological learning. Students will research connections to professional development resulting in a career portfolio project. Required of all Senior Sociology Majors

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to the sociological understanding of human interaction group process and social structures. Students are introduced to basic concepts theories and methods of sociological investigation. Majors and minors must pass with a grade of "C" or better.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of traditional and contemporary problems associated with major social institutions such as the family economics government and education. Social forces related to ethnicity social class health and welfare and urbanization are also included. Alternative remedial measures based on behavioral science theories are discussed. Majors and minors must pass with a grade of "C" or better.

Electives (5 courses, 20 credits)

Choose five additional Sociology electives, at least one must be at the 200-level, and at least two must be at the 300-level:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The goal of the course is to provide a broad overview of children and youth and their place in American society. Particular attention is paid to (1) the impact of geographical location social class gender race sexuality popular culture mass media and technology; (2)the intersection of youth cultures and mainstream society; and (3) the contention that some youth cultures are "deviant".

Prerequisites:

SOC-113 OR SOC-116 and MATH-128 or higher

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students will be introduced to descriptive and basic inferential statistical techniques. The course will provide information on the following topics: Description - measures of central tendency (mean median mode) and measures of dispersion (range standard deviation); logic of statistical inference including normal curve and sampling distribution; hypothesis testing with one sample and two samples; measures of association between two variables (bivariate analysis) including chi-square regression and correlation; and introduction to multivariate regression. Students will utilize SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) software to input and analyze data. The goals of the course are for students to appreciate the need for statistical methods in the broad field of sociology and to gain basic statistical literacy.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will explore our natural environment and human interacations with it. We will connect a critical study of society power and inequality to the study of our natural environment and the ways it is altered by human behaviors. We will also consider ways to change our society's relationship with the natural environment to keep our earth clean and safe for human society.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An exploration of the diversity of contemporary families. Comparisons are made between the cultural myths of the "ideal family" and the lived realities. Challenges confronting contemporary families and their implications for social policy are examined in such areas as work/family conflicts gay and lesbian families welfare family violence.

Credits:

4

Description:

Spain has experienced major socio-demographic changes since the mid 1970s. These transformations mainly arise from the new role of women in society and, in particular, women's higher levels of education, work experience, and labor market attachment. The changes in women's labor force participation have occurred in conjunction with a progressive postponement of main family events, such as leaving the parental home, forming a partnership and having children, as well as with a reduction in the family size. Spain is, indeed," characterized as having one of the ""lowest low fertility levels"" within Western industrialized countries\"

Prerequisites:

This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of the fundamental purpose and functions of religion in society. Major religious systems in America are analyzed in terms of basic values and structure. The impact of changes in religious organizations upon clergy laity and society are discussed. This class fulfills the ECR requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the role of race in United States society and the efforts to achieve racial justice in the United States. It introduces students to the formation and transformation of racial systems throughout American history and examines the ways race impacts our lived experiences today. Students will assess the social significance of race by examining the realities of white supremacy and the experience of race.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this class we will discuss racial ethnic and cultural groups and use sociology as a way to understand some of the larger patterns of immigration identity intergroup relations privilege discrimination and oppression. Students will increase their awareness and appreciation of diversity and examine cultural difference from a sociological perspective. The course will help students understand how culture impacts our world and thus help them prepare personally and professionally to succeed in a global context.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides students with an introduction to how social norms structures and practices shape experiences of illness and health. Among the topics that will be covered are: health and the environment the reasons some groups of people are less healthy than others living with chronic illness and disabilities and public debates surrounding issues such as performance enhancing drugs and sports Attention Deficit Disorder and the HPV vaccine. Required for all students in the health Medicine and the Body Concentration.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Consideration of the physiological psychological and social factors associated with the aging process. Contemporary American values toward the elderly are compared and contrasted with historical and cross-cultural studies. Current opportunities and techniques enabling the elderly to enrich and expand their societal roles are explored.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of changing definitions of life and death social factors affecting causes and rates of death care of the dying and their families institutionalization the funeral industry suicide crisis intervention and the impact of technology on the dying process.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of how different cultures understand health and illness. Healing approaches from Asia Africa and the Americas will be explored.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A critical analysis of theory and research related to the socialization roles and social participation of women in contemporary society.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of human sexuality as experience and institution. Sexuality is considered in relationship to power love religion family race gender sexual orientation violence and courtship.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Law and legal systems are examined in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on the manner in which legal structures and processes interact with other social arrangements and are transformed over time.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Education is key in a democracy in which students need to develop themselves into knowledgeable people with a strong sense of self able to think critically with a developed ability to question others and to feel and act as empowered active citizens. This is a tall order given the varieties of pressures on schools these days. But it is extremely important for these skills to be developed. With the shift in the economy schools are going to be the critical factor in enabling students to compete in a globalized workplace and world.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores the emergence of the self as an intersection of biography history and social structure. Emphasis is on modern Western societies. Conceptually we will take a life course approach which emphasizes processes of psychosocial moral intellectual and spiritual development for contemporary men and women. This course is designed in part as a workshop where students will develop the skills and insights essential for conducting life history research and biographical studies that are sociological in focus.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A course with special interest topics in sociology which changes depending on the professor.

Prerequisites:

SOC-113 or SOC-116

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Globalization is shrinking the world. How and why did this happen? This course will explore global change and the global processes which effect key social institutions: culture the economy and politics. Students will study the processes of globalization and its impact on our lives and people around the globe.

Prerequisites:

SOC-113 or SOC-116

Credits:

4.00

Description:

What are the roles of race and ethnicity from a global perspective? A global racial hierarchy determines who experiences privilege or oppression. Students will examine how the meanings of race and ethnicity can vary by location and how they matter globally.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will look at the special opportunities and obligations of those in the health and legal professions to protect human rights. There will be an overview of human rights doctrine and key documents. Students will learn to apply human rights principles to particular occupations in the health and legal professions.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A study of the different types and functions of communities. Through identifying community needs resources and structure students learn effective ways to organize for change.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines U.S. Immigration legislation and policies focusing on how and why various immigration laws and policies have been established and implemented throughout history. We will address the intersection between immigration policy and race ethnicity nationality and socioeconomic status as well as explore the effects that immigration laws have had on various immigrant groups and society in general.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of urban spaces within society. With a focus on U.S. cities and Boston in particular the course will explore topics such as urbanization and urban life cultural diversity social inequality gentrification environmental concerns and crime.

Prerequisites:

This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. In this course students will learn about how the U.S. health care system works. We will study the politics and economics of the health care system and discuss the key health care policy issues of this decade. Using the theoretical perspectives provided by sociology we will look at issues of power hierarchy race and gender vis-a-vis the health care system. Reading for this course centers on first person narratives by people working in the health care system. This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An exploration of topics that relate particularly to women as providers and consumers in the health care system. The course will consider historical and current information on issues of reproduction technology health and illness.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The United States of America: "A land of immigrants"; "The Great Melting Pot". This country has indeed attracted immigrants from all over the world. However many of them are not welcomed or treated equally. This course will focus on the reasons various immigrant groups (past and present) have come to the United States. We will examine their experiences and the impact race ethnicity gender class and social structures have had on them and their families. We will also explore and compare the experiences of groups who are welcomed as potential citizens and other groups who are not.

Prerequisites:

Students must be Sociology majors with at least a 3.0 GPA; must have at least sophomore status at the time of application; must have one full day free each week to work an internship. Applications for the Internship in Sociology I course must be approved by the Instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students are provided with the opportunity to apply academic learning in a supervised internship consistent with their personal career goals or academic interest. The course covers such topics as career exploration and development resume and cover letter writing job fairs and networking and graduate school applications. In addition to the course assignments students are required to complete a minimum full day internship each per week during the entire semester.

Prerequisites:

SOC-483. Students must be Sociology majors with at least a 3.0 GPA; must have at least sophomore status at the time of application; must have one full day free each week to work an internship. Applications for the Internship in Sociology I course must be approved by the Instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students are provided an opportunity to intensify or extend their internship experience. The course covers such topics as mock interviewing informational interviewing and job fairs.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Members of the department hold special meetings with students and direct them in investigating topics of interest in sociology. Arrangements for independent study must be approved by the supervising instructor and the Department Chairperson.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only; Instructor approval required.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Members of the department hold special meetings with students and direct them in investigating topics of interest in sociology. Arrangements for independent study must be approved by the supervising instructor and the Department Chairperson.

Prerequisites:

Instructor consent required.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Each honors student will engage in an independent reading research and writing project that can take the form of a traditional research paper of 20-25 pages or an equivalent volunteer and writing experience. The Honors Project must be supervised by a full-time Sociology faculty member. A poster presentation of the project must be presented at the CAS Honors symposium in the fall or the spring of the senior year as well as at the Sociology Honors Award ceremony at the end of the spring semester for students graduating in the spring or summer. This course is required for all Sociology Honor Students.

Note: SOC-510, SOC-H510 and SOC-H555 must be taken for a minimum of 4 credits to count as major electives.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Sociology Major Learning Goals & Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Students will...
Students will be able to...
Demonstrate an understanding of the discipline of Sociology
  • Apply sociological principles and key concepts to analysis of the social world
  • Articulate an understanding of diverse social worlds
  • Demonstrate an understanding of sociological theory
  • Demonstrate familiarity with classical and contemporary sociological theories
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply classical and contemporary sociological theories to more fully understand social conditions
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of research methods in Sociology
  • Articulate and define the steps in the research process
  • Read and critically analyze research articles
  •  Think critically
  • Become active consumers of social information from both academic and non-academic sources and prepare to be engaged citizens
  • Understand social worlds outside of the western/industrial social worlds and realities which do not always apply to the developing world.
  • Sociology Minor

    Learn more about this minor

    Minor Requirements: 5 courses, 20 credits

    Core Requirements (2 courses, 8 credits)

    Choose one of the following:

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to the sociological understanding of human interaction group process and social structures. Students are introduced to basic concepts theories and methods of sociological investigation. Majors and minors must pass with a grade of "C" or better.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of traditional and contemporary problems associated with major social institutions such as the family economics government and education. Social forces related to ethnicity social class health and welfare and urbanization are also included. Alternative remedial measures based on behavioral science theories are discussed. Majors and minors must pass with a grade of "C" or better.

    Choose one of the following:

    Prerequisites:

    SOC-113 or SOC-116 with "C" or better & one other SOC course. Cannot be taken concurrently with SOC-310, SOC-315, or SOC-333.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    How sociologists decide what to study how they select a research design sample and collect data analyze results interpret findings and write up reports. Students are introduced to the techniques most frequently used by sociologists and undertake their own small research project. Required for all Sociology majors.

    Prerequisites:

    SOC-113 or 116 with a grade of "C" or better and one other SOC course. Cannot be taken concurrently with SOC-214.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination and comparison of the origin development and structure of the major theoretical approaches in contemporary sociology. Contributions of different branches of sociology to theory are explored with special attention to the relevance of sociological explanations for society and the social process. Students must have taken SOC 113 or SOC 116 and passed with a "C" or better and one other course from the sociology department. Normally offered every semester.

    Elective Courses (3 courses, 12 credits)

    Students may choose any three Sociology electives; at least one of which must be at the 300-level

    Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

    Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major or double major combination to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

    Accelerated Bachelor's/Master's Degree in Crime and Justice Studies

    Learn more about this accelerated degree

    Degree Requirements

    1. Students admitted to this dual degree program must meet 1) all the requirements of an undergraduate Sociology major, including completion of at least two CJU electives, or 2) all the requirements of an undergraduate Criminal Justice major.
    2. Students must also meet all requirements for the Master of Science in Crime & Justice Studies.
    3. The two graduate courses taken during the senior year will count toward BOTH the undergraduate and graduate degree requirements. Credit hours will be awarded based on the graduate course description.
    4. Before enrolling in any Master's level courses, students must obtain approval for classes through the MSCJS graduate program director.
    5. Students are subject to the usual standards for academic standing, i.e., undergraduate standards for undergraduate courses and graduate standards for graduate courses.

    Upon successful completion of all of the degree requirements, a student will receive a dual Bachelor’s and Master’s degree. The exact degree will be awarded based on the specific undergraduate program the student completes. A student may permanently exit the dual degree program and opt to graduate with a Bachelor’s degree if all the requirements for a Bachelor’s degree have been met. In this case, the graduate courses taken in the senior year will be counted as 4-credit courses applied toward the undergraduate degree requirements.

    Honors

    To complete requirements for honors in the major, a candidate must:

    1. Graduate with a major GPA of 3.5 or higher
    2. Graduate with an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher
    3. Complete SOC-H555 Senior Honors Project OR complete a designated SOC course using the honors contract system
    4. CAS Honors Program students only: Also present work from the senior honors experience at the Honors Symposium or Pecha Kucha event.

    To become a candidate for honors in the major, a student must either:

    1. Have a major GPA of 3.5 or higher
    2. Have an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher

    CAS Honors Program students only: CAS Honors Program students who fulfill the above GPA requirement are assumed to be candidates for departmental honors and should consult with a major advisor during their junior year about registering for major honors requirements as described above

    All other students: Apply to the honors coordinator

    Societies

    Alpha Kappa Delta

    Alpha Kappa Delta is the National Honor Society for Sociology majors who have demonstrated excellence in sociology. Its purpose is to promote in each of the various chapters an interest in sociology, research in social problems, and activities leading to human welfare. The Suffolk Chapter has been designated Iota of Massachusetts. To be eligible for membership, candidates must be of junior or senior status, have a 3.3 average overall, and a 3.0 average in Sociology courses taken at the host institution. Students must have taken at least four courses in Sociology at Suffolk.

    Sociology Courses

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to the sociological understanding of human interaction group process and social structures. Students are introduced to basic concepts theories and methods of sociological investigation. Majors and minors must pass with a grade of "C" or better.

    Prerequisites:

    CAS and SBS honor students or students with a GPA of 3.3 and above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to the sociological understanding of human interaction group process and social structures. Students are introduced to basic concepts theories and methods of sociological investigation. Majors and minors must pass with a grade of "C" or better.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of traditional and contemporary problems associated with major social institutions such as the family economics government and education. Social forces related to ethnicity social class health and welfare and urbanization are also included. Alternative remedial measures based on behavioral science theories are discussed. Majors and minors must pass with a grade of "C" or better.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The goal of the course is to provide a broad overview of children and youth and their place in American society. Particular attention is paid to (1) the impact of geographical location social class gender race sexuality popular culture mass media and technology; (2)the intersection of youth cultures and mainstream society; and (3) the contention that some youth cultures are "deviant".

    Prerequisites:

    SOC-113 OR SOC-116 and MATH-128 or higher

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In this course students will be introduced to descriptive and basic inferential statistical techniques. The course will provide information on the following topics: Description - measures of central tendency (mean median mode) and measures of dispersion (range standard deviation); logic of statistical inference including normal curve and sampling distribution; hypothesis testing with one sample and two samples; measures of association between two variables (bivariate analysis) including chi-square regression and correlation; and introduction to multivariate regression. Students will utilize SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) software to input and analyze data. The goals of the course are for students to appreciate the need for statistical methods in the broad field of sociology and to gain basic statistical literacy.

    Prerequisites:

    SOC-113 or SOC-116 with "C" or better & one other SOC course. Cannot be taken concurrently with SOC-310, SOC-315, or SOC-333.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    How sociologists decide what to study how they select a research design sample and collect data analyze results interpret findings and write up reports. Students are introduced to the techniques most frequently used by sociologists and undertake their own small research project. Required for all Sociology majors.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will explore our natural environment and human interacations with it. We will connect a critical study of society power and inequality to the study of our natural environment and the ways it is altered by human behaviors. We will also consider ways to change our society's relationship with the natural environment to keep our earth clean and safe for human society.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An exploration of the diversity of contemporary families. Comparisons are made between the cultural myths of the "ideal family" and the lived realities. Challenges confronting contemporary families and their implications for social policy are examined in such areas as work/family conflicts gay and lesbian families welfare family violence.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Spain has experienced major socio-demographic changes since the mid 1970s. These transformations mainly arise from the new role of women in society and, in particular, women's higher levels of education, work experience, and labor market attachment. The changes in women's labor force participation have occurred in conjunction with a progressive postponement of main family events, such as leaving the parental home, forming a partnership and having children, as well as with a reduction in the family size. Spain is, indeed," characterized as having one of the ""lowest low fertility levels"" within Western industrialized countries\"

    Prerequisites:

    This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of the fundamental purpose and functions of religion in society. Major religious systems in America are analyzed in terms of basic values and structure. The impact of changes in religious organizations upon clergy laity and society are discussed. This class fulfills the ECR requirement.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the role of race in United States society and the efforts to achieve racial justice in the United States. It introduces students to the formation and transformation of racial systems throughout American history and examines the ways race impacts our lived experiences today. Students will assess the social significance of race by examining the realities of white supremacy and the experience of race.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In this class we will discuss racial ethnic and cultural groups and use sociology as a way to understand some of the larger patterns of immigration identity intergroup relations privilege discrimination and oppression. Students will increase their awareness and appreciation of diversity and examine cultural difference from a sociological perspective. The course will help students understand how culture impacts our world and thus help them prepare personally and professionally to succeed in a global context.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will look at the special opportunities and obligations of those in the health and legal professions to protect human rights. There will be an overview of human rights doctrine and key documents. Students will learn to apply human rights principles to particular occupations in the health and legal professions.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will provide an in-depth analysis of family dynamics as well as some beginning skills in counseling families. Using a systems approach students will learn about family roles sibling constellations and different types of families. The importance of ethnicity and culture in shaping family values and organization will be emphasized. Students will be encouraged to study their own families of origin so they might better understand how families change.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course provides students with an introduction to how social norms structures and practices shape experiences of illness and health. Among the topics that will be covered are: health and the environment the reasons some groups of people are less healthy than others living with chronic illness and disabilities and public debates surrounding issues such as performance enhancing drugs and sports Attention Deficit Disorder and the HPV vaccine. Required for all students in the health Medicine and the Body Concentration.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Consideration of the physiological psychological and social factors associated with the aging process. Contemporary American values toward the elderly are compared and contrasted with historical and cross-cultural studies. Current opportunities and techniques enabling the elderly to enrich and expand their societal roles are explored.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of changing definitions of life and death social factors affecting causes and rates of death care of the dying and their families institutionalization the funeral industry suicide crisis intervention and the impact of technology on the dying process.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of how different cultures understand health and illness. Healing approaches from Asia Africa and the Americas will be explored.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A critical analysis of theory and research related to the socialization roles and social participation of women in contemporary society.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of human sexuality as experience and institution. Sexuality is considered in relationship to power love religion family race gender sexual orientation violence and courtship.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Law and legal systems are examined in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on the manner in which legal structures and processes interact with other social arrangements and are transformed over time.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Education is key in a democracy in which students need to develop themselves into knowledgeable people with a strong sense of self able to think critically with a developed ability to question others and to feel and act as empowered active citizens. This is a tall order given the varieties of pressures on schools these days. But it is extremely important for these skills to be developed. With the shift in the economy schools are going to be the critical factor in enabling students to compete in a globalized workplace and world.

    Prerequisites:

    SOC-113 or 116 with a grade of "C" or better and one other SOC course. Cannot be taken concurrently with SOC-214.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination and comparison of the origin development and structure of the major theoretical approaches in contemporary sociology. Contributions of different branches of sociology to theory are explored with special attention to the relevance of sociological explanations for society and the social process. Students must have taken SOC 113 or SOC 116 and passed with a "C" or better and one other course from the sociology department. Normally offered every semester.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores the emergence of the self as an intersection of biography history and social structure. Emphasis is on modern Western societies. Conceptually we will take a life course approach which emphasizes processes of psychosocial moral intellectual and spiritual development for contemporary men and women. This course is designed in part as a workshop where students will develop the skills and insights essential for conducting life history research and biographical studies that are sociological in focus.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A course with special interest topics in sociology which changes depending on the professor.

    Prerequisites:

    SOC-113 or SOC-116

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Globalization is shrinking the world. How and why did this happen? This course will explore global change and the global processes which effect key social institutions: culture the economy and politics. Students will study the processes of globalization and its impact on our lives and people around the globe.

    Prerequisites:

    SOC-113 or SOC-116

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    What are the roles of race and ethnicity from a global perspective? A global racial hierarchy determines who experiences privilege or oppression. Students will examine how the meanings of race and ethnicity can vary by location and how they matter globally.

    Prerequisites:

    SOC-333 or SOC-234

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An investigation of the emergence organization and structure of police systems. The course focuses on the conditions surrounding the relationship between the police and policed in different historical cultural political and economic contexts.

    Prerequisites:

    SOC-234 or SOC-333;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Correctional theories are reviewed along with the historical development of probation and parole. Current research and analytical perspectives reflecting on administrative problems innovative policies and the internal philosophical inconsistencies of these systems are examined.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will look at the special opportunities and obligations of those in the health and legal professions to protect human rights. There will be an overview of human rights doctrine and key documents. Students will learn to apply human rights principles to particular occupations in the health and legal professions.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A study of the different types and functions of communities. Through identifying community needs resources and structure students learn effective ways to organize for change.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines U.S. Immigration legislation and policies focusing on how and why various immigration laws and policies have been established and implemented throughout history. We will address the intersection between immigration policy and race ethnicity nationality and socioeconomic status as well as explore the effects that immigration laws have had on various immigrant groups and society in general.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is an introduction to the sociological study of urban spaces within society. With a focus on U.S. cities and Boston in particular the course will explore topics such as urbanization and urban life cultural diversity social inequality gentrification environmental concerns and crime.

    Prerequisites:

    This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. In this course students will learn about how the U.S. health care system works. We will study the politics and economics of the health care system and discuss the key health care policy issues of this decade. Using the theoretical perspectives provided by sociology we will look at issues of power hierarchy race and gender vis-a-vis the health care system. Reading for this course centers on first person narratives by people working in the health care system. This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An exploration of topics that relate particularly to women as providers and consumers in the health care system. The course will consider historical and current information on issues of reproduction technology health and illness.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of prison writings films and the actual experience of prison life from literary and sociological perspectives. Students will have an opportunity to examine their own perspectives of "the prison" as a symbol and shadow in American Society and compare these impressions with the actual experience of inmates correctional officers and others who have lived in the "prison nation".

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The United States of America: "A land of immigrants"; "The Great Melting Pot". This country has indeed attracted immigrants from all over the world. However many of them are not welcomed or treated equally. This course will focus on the reasons various immigrant groups (past and present) have come to the United States. We will examine their experiences and the impact race ethnicity gender class and social structures have had on them and their families. We will also explore and compare the experiences of groups who are welcomed as potential citizens and other groups who are not.

    Prerequisites:

    SOC-113 or SOC-116 (with a grade of "C" or better) SOC-214, and SOC-315 or SOC-333. Seniors only. Required of all majors.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores topics in sociology that require students to synthesize and analyze their accumulated sociological learning. Students will research connections to professional development resulting in a career portfolio project. Required of all Senior Sociology Majors

    Prerequisites:

    Students must be Sociology majors with at least a 3.0 GPA; must have at least sophomore status at the time of application; must have one full day free each week to work an internship. Applications for the Internship in Sociology I course must be approved by the Instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Students are provided with the opportunity to apply academic learning in a supervised internship consistent with their personal career goals or academic interest. The course covers such topics as career exploration and development resume and cover letter writing job fairs and networking and graduate school applications. In addition to the course assignments students are required to complete a minimum full day internship each per week during the entire semester.

    Prerequisites:

    SOC-483. Students must be Sociology majors with at least a 3.0 GPA; must have at least sophomore status at the time of application; must have one full day free each week to work an internship. Applications for the Internship in Sociology I course must be approved by the Instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Students are provided an opportunity to intensify or extend their internship experience. The course covers such topics as mock interviewing informational interviewing and job fairs.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Members of the department hold special meetings with students and direct them in investigating topics of interest in sociology. Arrangements for independent study must be approved by the supervising instructor and the Department Chairperson.

    Prerequisites:

    CAS Honors students only; Instructor approval required.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Members of the department hold special meetings with students and direct them in investigating topics of interest in sociology. Arrangements for independent study must be approved by the supervising instructor and the Department Chairperson.

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor consent required.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Each honors student will engage in an independent reading research and writing project that can take the form of a traditional research paper of 20-25 pages or an equivalent volunteer and writing experience. The Honors Project must be supervised by a full-time Sociology faculty member. A poster presentation of the project must be presented at the CAS Honors symposium in the fall or the spring of the senior year as well as at the Sociology Honors Award ceremony at the end of the spring semester for students graduating in the spring or summer. This course is required for all Sociology Honor Students.