Science and Mathematics Pathway

The Undergraduate Science and Mathematics Pathway program provides academic, language and cultural support needed to succeed at Suffolk University. Upon meeting progression requirements, students matriculate into the BS program of their choice. Other degree options are available as well. Pathway duration is based on English language abilities determined at the time of admission to the University.

Three types of Undergraduate Science and Mathematics Pathways are available.

1 Semester Pathway

This program is composed of one semester of pathway programming which count toward the student's undergraduate degree.

Pathway Requirements: 5 courses with corresponding laboratories, 17 credits

Prerequisites:

CAS students only. SBS students by special permission.

Credits:

1

Description:

CAS 101 is a one-credit course that meets once a week and is designed to help you have a successful transition to Suffolk University and our unique urban community. It is also designed to introduce you to the principles and concepts of Oral Communication and Presentation Skills. Through interactive exercises and engaging assignments, you will explore the campus environment and learn about strategies for success as a student. You will present speeches about your research and activities to improve your abilities as a speaker.

Prerequisites:

INTO Pathway Students Only

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is designed to link thematically and rhetorically to EAP 104. By taking both courses, you will be honing the practice of transferring knowledge between courses, as well as between school and your personal experiences and prior knowledge.

Prerequisites:

INTO Pathway Students Only

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is designed to strengthen the academic reading and writing skills that will be applicable to your collegiate course work by using course materials that will help us to understand cultural, social and global issues in the contemporary world. We will work together as a class to continue to develop the analytical skills necessary to produce well-organized and well-written essays. We will think critically about social change and contemporary social problems. We will pay significant attention to the writing process including prewriting, writing a strong thesis statement, revising, editing and proofreading. We will review the proper use of sources so as to avoid plagiarism, and will conduct our own research on topics relating to issues of cultural, social and global perspectives.

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

MATH-104, MATH-121 or MATH level 4

Credits:

4

Description:

A one-semester introduction to differential and integral calculus. Theory is presented informally and topics and techniques are limited to polynomials, rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions. Topics include a review of precalculus, limits and continuity, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives to graphing, minima/maxima, applications of the derivative, marginal analysis, differential equations of growth and decay, anti-derivatives, the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and area measurements. This course cannot be used to satisfy core or complementary requirements by students majoring in chemistry, computer science, engineering, mathematics, or physics. Several sections offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 with a minimum grade of C, MATH-075, or MATH level 5

Credits:

4

Description:

Functions, limits and continuity, squeeze theorem, limits at infinity; instantaneous rate of change, tangent slopes, and the definition of the derivative of a function; power, product, and quotient rules, trig derivatives, chain rule, implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; derivatives of other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions, exponential and log functions, hyperbolic trig functions); applications of the derivative (implicit differentiation, related rates, optimization, differentials, curve sketching, L'Hopital's rule); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Choose one of the following courses with the corresponding laboratory:

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO L114 concurrently.

Credits:

3

Description:

Rigorous introduction to organismal biology emphasizing evolution, phylogenetics, form, and function. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO 114 concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

A series of laboratory experiences in evolution, diversity, anatomy and physiology.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 or higher (previously or concurrently) and PHYS L151 concurrently

Credits:

3

Description:

PHYS 151 is the first of three courses (PHYS 151, 152, 153) that comprise the calculus based introductory physics sequence at Suffolk University intended for students majoring in the physical sciences, engineering and mathematics. This course aims to teach basic techniques in physics that fall under the topic of classical mechanics and their application in understanding the natural world. Specific topics include the study of vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, fluid mechanics, simple harmonic motion, mechanical waves, sound and hearing. The student will learn how to analyze physical situations by using simple models, and also how to solve those models and derive useful conclusions from them. This course will show students how experimental results and mathematical representations are combined to create testable scientific theories, and how the complexities of most real-life physical situations can be reduced to simple problems by identifying the essential physical features and ignoring the rest. The student will learn to distinguish the scientific approach to physical situations from other ways of looking at them, for example, artistic, humanistic, and business.

Prerequisites:

MATH 121 or higher (previously or concurrently) PHYS 151 concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: measurements, propagation of errors, vectors, Newton's laws, work and energy, momentum, rotations, oscillations, simple harmonic motion, fluid. Knowledge of algebra, trigonometry, differentiation and integration required.

2 Semester Pathway

This program is composed of two semesters of pathway programming which count toward the student's undergraduate degree.

Pathway Requirements: 9 courses with corresponding laboratories, 33 credits

Semester 1 (5 courses with corresponding laboratories, 17 credits)

Prerequisites:

CAS students only. SBS students by special permission.

Credits:

1

Description:

CAS 101 is a one-credit course that meets once a week and is designed to help you have a successful transition to Suffolk University and our unique urban community. It is also designed to introduce you to the principles and concepts of Oral Communication and Presentation Skills. Through interactive exercises and engaging assignments, you will explore the campus environment and learn about strategies for success as a student. You will present speeches about your research and activities to improve your abilities as a speaker.

Prerequisites:

INTO Pathway Students Only

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is designed to focus on the oral communication skills needed to be successful students, as well as successful professionals. Through lectures, text, and practical applications; students will learn how to select a topic, tailor a presentation to a specific audience, research, design and structure an oral presentation. Students will also learn to collaborate with a team of colleagues, utilize visual aids, and critique professional/rhetorical situations. In addition, students will expand their listening skills to extract meaning from and take notes on authentic academic conversations and lectures. In addition, EAP 101 is linked thematically and rhetorically to EAP 102. By taking both courses, you will be honing the practice of transferring knowledge between courses," as well as between school and your personal experiences and prior knowledge. """

Prerequisites:

INTO Pathway Students Only

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is designed to familiarize students with the academic reading and writing skills that will be applicable to your collegiate course work. We will work together as a class to develop the analytical skills necessary to produce well-organized and well-written essays. We will pay significant attention to the writing process including prewriting, writing a strong thesis statement, revising, editing and proofreading. We will review the proper use of sources so as to avoid plagiarism.

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

MATH-104, MATH-121 or MATH level 4

Credits:

4

Description:

A one-semester introduction to differential and integral calculus. Theory is presented informally and topics and techniques are limited to polynomials, rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions. Topics include a review of precalculus, limits and continuity, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives to graphing, minima/maxima, applications of the derivative, marginal analysis, differential equations of growth and decay, anti-derivatives, the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and area measurements. This course cannot be used to satisfy core or complementary requirements by students majoring in chemistry, computer science, engineering, mathematics, or physics. Several sections offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 with a minimum grade of C, MATH-075, or MATH level 5

Credits:

4

Description:

Functions, limits and continuity, squeeze theorem, limits at infinity; instantaneous rate of change, tangent slopes, and the definition of the derivative of a function; power, product, and quotient rules, trig derivatives, chain rule, implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; derivatives of other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions, exponential and log functions, hyperbolic trig functions); applications of the derivative (implicit differentiation, related rates, optimization, differentials, curve sketching, L'Hopital's rule); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Choose one of the following courses with the corresponding laboratory:

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO L114 concurrently.

Credits:

3

Description:

Rigorous introduction to organismal biology emphasizing evolution, phylogenetics, form, and function. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO 114 concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

A series of laboratory experiences in evolution, diversity, anatomy and physiology.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 or higher (previously or concurrently) and PHYS L151 concurrently

Credits:

3

Description:

PHYS 151 is the first of three courses (PHYS 151, 152, 153) that comprise the calculus based introductory physics sequence at Suffolk University intended for students majoring in the physical sciences, engineering and mathematics. This course aims to teach basic techniques in physics that fall under the topic of classical mechanics and their application in understanding the natural world. Specific topics include the study of vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, fluid mechanics, simple harmonic motion, mechanical waves, sound and hearing. The student will learn how to analyze physical situations by using simple models, and also how to solve those models and derive useful conclusions from them. This course will show students how experimental results and mathematical representations are combined to create testable scientific theories, and how the complexities of most real-life physical situations can be reduced to simple problems by identifying the essential physical features and ignoring the rest. The student will learn to distinguish the scientific approach to physical situations from other ways of looking at them, for example, artistic, humanistic, and business.

Prerequisites:

MATH 121 or higher (previously or concurrently) PHYS 151 concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: measurements, propagation of errors, vectors, Newton's laws, work and energy, momentum, rotations, oscillations, simple harmonic motion, fluid. Knowledge of algebra, trigonometry, differentiation and integration required.

Semester 2 (4 courses with corresponding laboratories, 16 credits)

Prerequisites:

INTO Pathway Students Only

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is designed to link thematically and rhetorically to EAP 104. By taking both courses, you will be honing the practice of transferring knowledge between courses, as well as between school and your personal experiences and prior knowledge.

Prerequisites:

INTO Pathway Students Only

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is designed to strengthen the academic reading and writing skills that will be applicable to your collegiate course work by using course materials that will help us to understand cultural, social and global issues in the contemporary world. We will work together as a class to continue to develop the analytical skills necessary to produce well-organized and well-written essays. We will think critically about social change and contemporary social problems. We will pay significant attention to the writing process including prewriting, writing a strong thesis statement, revising, editing and proofreading. We will review the proper use of sources so as to avoid plagiarism, and will conduct our own research on topics relating to issues of cultural, social and global perspectives.

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH 104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH 104 must take MATH 104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-L111.

Credits:

3

Description:

Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces atomic structure, stoichiometry, the periodic table, the nature of chemical bonds, and chemical reactions. This course is recommended for science majors or those considering careers in the health sciences.

Prerequisites:

MATH-104 MATH-108 MATH-121 MATH-128 MATH-130 MATH-134 MATH-164 MATH-165 MATHT-MPEL1 MATHT-MPEL2 or MATHT-MPEL3. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 111.

Credits:

1

Description:

"Introduces the basic principles of chemistry through ""discovery"" laboratory experiments. Learn safe laboratory practices and basic techniques such as determining mass and volume\"

Choose one of the following courses with the corresponding laboratory:

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO L111 concurrently

Credits:

3

Description:

Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

Concurrently with BIO 111

Credits:

1

Description:

Sessions are designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules, and the techniques used in their study. The techniques covered include basic solution preparation, separation and quantification of molecules, enzyme catalysis,and cell isolation.

Prerequisites:

MATH-164 or MATH-165 with a minimum grade of C

Credits:

4

Description:

Riemann sums and definite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (areas); integration of exponential functions, trig functions, and inverse trig functions; techniques of integration (substitution, by parts, trig integrals, trig substitution, partial fractions); area, volume, and average value applications; differential equations (separable, exponential growth, linear); improper integrals; infinite sequences and series; convergence tests; power series; Taylor and Maclaurin series (computation, convergence, error estimates, differentiation and integration of Taylor series). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-151 and PHYS-L151. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS-L152.

Credits:

3

Description:

This calculus based course begins with topics in kinetic theory and the laws of thermodynamics. It then covers electric charge and field, Gauss' law, electrical potential and capacitance, electric currents and DC circuits. Next magnetism, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law and AC circuits are discussed. This is followed by Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, and properties of light.

Prerequisites:

PHYS 151 and L151 and PHYS 152 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: heat, gas laws, electric forces, field, and potential, DC and AC circuits, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law, optics. Calculus, algebra, trigonometry are required. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks, and formal reports required.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-L111 concurrently

Credits:

3

Description:

Applies the fundamentals of science to environmental issues. Topics include population dynamics and resources, environmental degradation, ecosystems, geologic processes, deforestation, biodiversity, climate change, air, soil, and water resource management, and pollution and risks to health.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-111 concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

Laboratory exercises are used to illustrate topics covered in UES 111. Field testing and analysis of environmental samples. Field trips may be required.

3 Semester Pathway

This program is composed of three semesters of pathway programming. Academic English courses taken in term 1 are not for academic credit. All courses taken in term 2 and 3 of the pathway will count towards the student's undergraduate degree.

Pathway Requirements: 14 courses with corresponding laboratories, 37 credits

Semester 1 (5 courses, 4 credits)

Prerequisites:

INTO Pathway Students Only

Credits:

0

Description:

The goal of this course is to increase fluency and build student confidence in listening and speaking through a variety of student-centered activities. Specifically, students will advance and practice their listening and speaking skills in academic situations including group work, note-taking exercises, oral presentations, and class discussions. Vocabulary, pronunciation, delivery, and active listening will be addressed, among other skills. This course is designed for students at an intermediate level. This is a non-credit course.

Prerequisites:

INTO Pathway Students Only

Credits:

0

Description:

The goal of this course is to increase accuracy and build student confidence in reading and writing through a variety of student-centered activities. Specifically, students will advance and practice their reading and writing skills on a variety of topics through critical reading, critical thinking, and essay writing. Sentence level, paragraph level, and essay level writing with a focus on grammar, punctuation, and organization among other skills will be addressed. This course is designed for students at an intermediate level. This is a non-credit course.

Prerequisites:

INTO Pathway Students Only

Credits:

0

Description:

This course is designed to ensure a successful transition to Suffolk University and our unique urban community. Through class discussions, readings, and assignments, students will discuss a variety of topics, including academic success strategies, personal goals and self-awareness. Students will develop the skills and knowledge necessary to become a successful university student. This course is designed for students at an intermediate level. This is a non-credit course.

Prerequisites:

INTO Pathway Students Only

Credits:

0

Description:

This course will focus on American literature, culture and history. Course readings may include short stories, poetry, plays, excerpts of novels, and/or films that have impacted American history and explore the many aspects of American culture. The course focuses on reading comprehension, vocabulary development, presentation and discussion skills. This is a non-credit course.

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

MATH-104, MATH-121 or MATH level 4

Credits:

4

Description:

A one-semester introduction to differential and integral calculus. Theory is presented informally and topics and techniques are limited to polynomials, rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions. Topics include a review of precalculus, limits and continuity, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives to graphing, minima/maxima, applications of the derivative, marginal analysis, differential equations of growth and decay, anti-derivatives, the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and area measurements. This course cannot be used to satisfy core or complementary requirements by students majoring in chemistry, computer science, engineering, mathematics, or physics. Several sections offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 with a minimum grade of C, MATH-075, or MATH level 5

Credits:

4

Description:

Functions, limits and continuity, squeeze theorem, limits at infinity; instantaneous rate of change, tangent slopes, and the definition of the derivative of a function; power, product, and quotient rules, trig derivatives, chain rule, implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; derivatives of other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions, exponential and log functions, hyperbolic trig functions); applications of the derivative (implicit differentiation, related rates, optimization, differentials, curve sketching, L'Hopital's rule); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Semester 2 (5 courses with corresponding laboratories, 17 credits)

Prerequisites:

CAS students only. SBS students by special permission.

Credits:

1

Description:

CAS 101 is a one-credit course that meets once a week and is designed to help you have a successful transition to Suffolk University and our unique urban community. It is also designed to introduce you to the principles and concepts of Oral Communication and Presentation Skills. Through interactive exercises and engaging assignments, you will explore the campus environment and learn about strategies for success as a student. You will present speeches about your research and activities to improve your abilities as a speaker.

Prerequisites:

INTO Pathway Students Only

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is designed to focus on the oral communication skills needed to be successful students, as well as successful professionals. Through lectures, text, and practical applications; students will learn how to select a topic, tailor a presentation to a specific audience, research, design and structure an oral presentation. Students will also learn to collaborate with a team of colleagues, utilize visual aids, and critique professional/rhetorical situations. In addition, students will expand their listening skills to extract meaning from and take notes on authentic academic conversations and lectures. In addition, EAP 101 is linked thematically and rhetorically to EAP 102. By taking both courses, you will be honing the practice of transferring knowledge between courses," as well as between school and your personal experiences and prior knowledge. """

Prerequisites:

INTO Pathway Students Only

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is designed to familiarize students with the academic reading and writing skills that will be applicable to your collegiate course work. We will work together as a class to develop the analytical skills necessary to produce well-organized and well-written essays. We will pay significant attention to the writing process including prewriting, writing a strong thesis statement, revising, editing and proofreading. We will review the proper use of sources so as to avoid plagiarism.

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4

Description:

This course offers a basic introduction to American culture and society through the study of American History. The city of Boston and its extraordinary history and institutions will be at the heart of the class and students will frequently visit sites close to the campus. Topics will focus on areas such as the way people from different cultures have understood and misunderstood each other; the evolution of American politics and political institutions; the American Revolution and the founding documents and institutions of the United States; the distinct forms of American religion, American literature and the American economy; slavery and race in American society; the rise of America to world power; the changing role of women; the New Deal and the rise of the modern welfare state; immigration; the development of popular culture; and the meaning of Donald Trump. This course fulfills te core requirement for the American Studies Minor. Enrollees in the Minor program may not register for AMST-111 Defining America and Americans.

  • Any Creativity and Innovation (CI) course
  • Subsequent math course (if required) based on semester 1 math placement

Choose one of the following courses with the corresponding laboratory:

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO L114 concurrently.

Credits:

3

Description:

Rigorous introduction to organismal biology emphasizing evolution, phylogenetics, form, and function. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO 114 concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

A series of laboratory experiences in evolution, diversity, anatomy and physiology.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 or higher (previously or concurrently) and PHYS L151 concurrently

Credits:

3

Description:

PHYS 151 is the first of three courses (PHYS 151, 152, 153) that comprise the calculus based introductory physics sequence at Suffolk University intended for students majoring in the physical sciences, engineering and mathematics. This course aims to teach basic techniques in physics that fall under the topic of classical mechanics and their application in understanding the natural world. Specific topics include the study of vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, fluid mechanics, simple harmonic motion, mechanical waves, sound and hearing. The student will learn how to analyze physical situations by using simple models, and also how to solve those models and derive useful conclusions from them. This course will show students how experimental results and mathematical representations are combined to create testable scientific theories, and how the complexities of most real-life physical situations can be reduced to simple problems by identifying the essential physical features and ignoring the rest. The student will learn to distinguish the scientific approach to physical situations from other ways of looking at them, for example, artistic, humanistic, and business.

Prerequisites:

MATH 121 or higher (previously or concurrently) PHYS 151 concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: measurements, propagation of errors, vectors, Newton's laws, work and energy, momentum, rotations, oscillations, simple harmonic motion, fluid. Knowledge of algebra, trigonometry, differentiation and integration required.

Semester 3 (4 courses with corresponding laboratories, 16 credits)

Prerequisites:

INTO Pathway Students Only

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is designed to link thematically and rhetorically to EAP 104. By taking both courses, you will be honing the practice of transferring knowledge between courses, as well as between school and your personal experiences and prior knowledge.

Prerequisites:

INTO Pathway Students Only

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is designed to strengthen the academic reading and writing skills that will be applicable to your collegiate course work by using course materials that will help us to understand cultural, social and global issues in the contemporary world. We will work together as a class to continue to develop the analytical skills necessary to produce well-organized and well-written essays. We will think critically about social change and contemporary social problems. We will pay significant attention to the writing process including prewriting, writing a strong thesis statement, revising, editing and proofreading. We will review the proper use of sources so as to avoid plagiarism, and will conduct our own research on topics relating to issues of cultural, social and global perspectives.

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH 104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH 104 must take MATH 104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-L111.

Credits:

3

Description:

Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces atomic structure, stoichiometry, the periodic table, the nature of chemical bonds, and chemical reactions. This course is recommended for science majors or those considering careers in the health sciences.

Prerequisites:

MATH-104 MATH-108 MATH-121 MATH-128 MATH-130 MATH-134 MATH-164 MATH-165 MATHT-MPEL1 MATHT-MPEL2 or MATHT-MPEL3. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 111.

Credits:

1

Description:

"Introduces the basic principles of chemistry through ""discovery"" laboratory experiments. Learn safe laboratory practices and basic techniques such as determining mass and volume\"

Choose one of the following courses with the corresponding laboratory:

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO L111 concurrently

Credits:

3

Description:

Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

Concurrently with BIO 111

Credits:

1

Description:

Sessions are designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules, and the techniques used in their study. The techniques covered include basic solution preparation, separation and quantification of molecules, enzyme catalysis,and cell isolation.

Prerequisites:

MATH-164 or MATH-165 with a minimum grade of C

Credits:

4

Description:

Riemann sums and definite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (areas); integration of exponential functions, trig functions, and inverse trig functions; techniques of integration (substitution, by parts, trig integrals, trig substitution, partial fractions); area, volume, and average value applications; differential equations (separable, exponential growth, linear); improper integrals; infinite sequences and series; convergence tests; power series; Taylor and Maclaurin series (computation, convergence, error estimates, differentiation and integration of Taylor series). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-151 and PHYS-L151. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS-L152.

Credits:

3

Description:

This calculus based course begins with topics in kinetic theory and the laws of thermodynamics. It then covers electric charge and field, Gauss' law, electrical potential and capacitance, electric currents and DC circuits. Next magnetism, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law and AC circuits are discussed. This is followed by Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, and properties of light.

Prerequisites:

PHYS 151 and L151 and PHYS 152 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: heat, gas laws, electric forces, field, and potential, DC and AC circuits, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law, optics. Calculus, algebra, trigonometry are required. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks, and formal reports required.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-L111 concurrently

Credits:

3

Description:

Applies the fundamentals of science to environmental issues. Topics include population dynamics and resources, environmental degradation, ecosystems, geologic processes, deforestation, biodiversity, climate change, air, soil, and water resource management, and pollution and risks to health.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-111 concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

Laboratory exercises are used to illustrate topics covered in UES 111. Field testing and analysis of environmental samples. Field trips may be required.

Note: course selection and sequence may vary based on math placement and intended major