Rachael Cobb, PhD

Associate Professor & Chair, Government

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Education

  • Ph.D. Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • AB, Political Science, Bryn Mawr College

Employment History

  • Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Government, Suffolk University, 2005-2006
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Government, Suffolk University, 2006-2011
  • Chair, Department of Government, Suffolk University, 2010-Present
  • Associate Professor, Department of Government, Suffolk University, 2011-Present

Areas of Teaching

  • Public Policy; Politics and Policy; American Politics; Election Law; Research Methods; Civic Engagement and Political Participation.

Research Interests

  • Cobb studies and teaches about election administration, civic engagement and political participation.

Publications, Conference Papers, Presentations, and Invited Talks

  • Cobb, Rachael V. 2012. “Can Voter ID Laws Be Administered in a Race-Neutral Manner? Evidence from the City of Boston in 2008.” Quarterly Journal of Political Science 7 (1): 1–33.
  • Skocpol, Theda, Rachael V. Cobb, and Casey Andrew Klofstad. 2005. “Disconnection and Reorganization: The Transformation of Civic Life in Late-Twentieth-Century America.” Studies in American Political Development 19 (02): 137–56.

Public Policy Achievements/Work

  • City of Boston Election Advisory Committee: member; MassVOTE Board Member.
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Courses Taught

  • GVT 110 - Introduction to American Government
  • GVT H110 - Honors Introduction to American Government
  • GVT 120 - Introduction to Research Methods
  • GVT 223 - American Politics and Institutions
  • GVT 224 - American Politics and Policy
  • GVT 315/615 - Labor and Politics
  • GVT 360/678 - Elections and Voting
  • GVT 436/631 - Topics in Public Policy: The Politics of Privatization
  • GVT 452/852 - Boston's Future: Local Politics in a Global Context
  • GVT 513 - The Presidency, Congress, and the Media
  • GVT 776 - Advanced Research Methods for Professional Politics
  • SF 101 - Inequality and Democracy: From the Local to the International