Undergraduate

  • ENG-095 Developmental English Skills I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is appropriate for native English speakers as well as non-native English speakers with a high level of oral fluency, but a need to improve English reading and writing skills for an academic setting. The course provides students with opportunities for and guidance in the development of Academic English writing. Class activities focus on aiding students in improving their academic English reading and writing skills to the proficiency levels required by the University. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of planning, organizing and revising essays, as well as learning how to analyze, summarize, and cite an author's ideas and words. Offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer Session I semesters. Course is enrolled by placement or instructor consent only.

  • ENG-096 Developmental English Skills II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A continuation of ENG 095, this course provides opportunities to both native and non-native English speakers for further development of Academic English proficiency. Class activities focus on aiding students in improving their academic English reading and writing skills to the proficiency levels required by the University. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of planning, organizing and revising essays, as well as learning how to analyze, summarize, and cite an author's ideas and words. Offered on the Madrid Campus only.

  • ENG-098 ESL Reading/Writing I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Utilizing a freshman-level English textbook and materials from the content courses, this course furnishes students with active reading strategies and the conventions of academic writing that will be applicable to their collegiate course work. Students will develop the analytical skills necessary for academic success by producing in-class and take-home essays, participating in debates, and giving oral presentations. Students will be required to work with a course management program and to utilize technology effectively in their writing. The skills obtained in these courses will allow students to participate comfortably in their mainstream college classes.

  • ENG-099 ESL Reading/Writing II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A continuation of ENG 098, this course further furnishes students with active reading strategies and the conventions of academic writing that will be applicable to their collegiate course work. Students will develop the analytical skills necessary for academic success by producing in-class and take-home essays, participating in debates, and giving oral presentations. Students will be required to work with a course management program and to utilize technology effectively in their writing. The skills obtained in these courses will allow students to participate comfortably in their mainstream college classes.

  • ENG-113 World Drama I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Survey of drama and theatre as part of world culture from classical Greece through 18th-century China. Normally offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-114 World Drama II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Survey of drama and theatre as part of world culture from the 19th century to the present.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-123 Great Books of the World I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Literary masterpieces from ancient times to the Renaissance, including: Homer's Odyssey, Sophocles' Oedipus, Virgil's Aeneid, selections from the Hebrew Bible and the Gospels, and Dante's Divine Comedy. List may vary at the discretion of the instructor.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Classics Minor,Social & Intellectual HST

  • ENG-124 Great Books of the World II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will introduce students to a selection of Great Books from around the world from the 17th century to the 21st, such as Don Quixote (Spain), Madame Bovary (France), The Communist Manifesto (Germany), The Origin of Species (England), War and Peace (Russia), On Dreams (Austria), Night (Hungary), Things Fall Apart (Nigeria), Satyagraha (India), I Am Prepared to Die (South Africa), Saeed the Pessoptomist (Israel), The Rouge of the North (China), and The House of Spirits (Chile). Readings may vary at the discretion of the instructor.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Social & Intellectual HST

  • ENG-130 Introduction to Literature

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study of poetry, prose, and drama, with emphasis on close reading and literary analysis. Students will compose formal essays discussing the meanings and relationship between texts as well as the author's craft and relationship to the reader. Offered every semester.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-135 World Literature in English

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A study of literature written in English from cultures around the world, with emphasis on major modern and contemporary writers from countries such as Australia, Canada, India, Ireland, Nigeria, South Africa and the Caribbean. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-H135 World Literature in English

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-103. 3.3 GPA or Honors student

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A study of literature written in English from cultures around the world, with emphasis on major modern and contemporary writers from countries such as Australia, Canada, India, Ireland, Nigeria, South Africa and the Caribbean. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Honors,Studies in Literature

  • ENG-141 Studies in British Literature

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study of poetry, prose, and drama from the British literary tradition, with emphasis on close reading and literary analysis. Students will compose formal essays discussing the meanings and relationship between texts as well as the author's craft and relationship to the reader. Offered every semester.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-H141 Honors Studies in British Literature

    Prerequisites:

    CAS Honors students only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study of poetry, prose, and drama from the British literary tradition, with emphasis on close reading and literary analysis. Students will compose formal essays discussing the meanings and relationship between texts as well as the author's craft and relationship to the reader. Offered every semester.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature,Honors

  • ENG-142 Studies in American Literature

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study of poetry, prose, and drama from the American literary tradition, with emphasis on close reading and literary analysis. Students will compose formal essays discussing the meanings and relationship between texts as well as the author's craft and relationship to the reader. Offered every semester.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-151 Introduction to African-American Literature

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Literature has the capacity to record and interrogate history in an imaginative and artistic context. African-American literature is a rich, varied, and complex body of literature that faces our tainted history directly. The authors we will read in this class examine slavery's long-term psychological and social effects while forging a literary history that is at once a part of and apart from American literary history more generally.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-152 Horror Fiction

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on the reading and analysis of horror literature and the ways in which horror reflects and represents personal and cultural anxieties. Readings will include both classic and contemporary authors, for example, Edgar Allan Poe, H.P. Lovecraft, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, and others. Assignments will include analytical essays as well as creative writing.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-153 Literature of War

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will examine a wide range of writers and film makers who have sought to bridge the gap that exists between those who have experienced war and those who have not. Some stories we will examine are told from an American perspective; some are told from the perspective of soldiers who fought against Americans; and some are told from those who experienced life under U.S. military occupation.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-154 Bob Dylan and the Beat Generation

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A study of literary works by the so-called Beat Generation," the American literary underworld of the late 1950s and 1960s, including major works by the three central figures (Ginsburg, Kerouac, Burroughs) and less central figures (Corso, Snyder, DiPrima, Jones/Baraka) as well as the influence of the Beats on the work of Bob Dylan, the only musician to win the Nobel Prize in Literature.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-155 Young Adult Literature

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Young Adult Literature's recent explosion in popularity raises important questions about the stories it tells, the values it promotes, and the audiences it seeks. This course approaches the YA phenomenon as one with deep historical roots as well as contemporary cultural relevance. From nineteenth century classics to current series favorites, literary works focused on young people reframe perennially fresh narratives about coming of age, negotiating personal identity, and navigating a complex moral universe. This course also considers YA literature as part of an evolving network of writers, readers, publishers, critics and filmmakers.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-H155 Honors Young Adult Literature

    Prerequisites:

    Restricted to CAS Honors Students only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Young Adult Literature's recent explosion in popularity raises important questions about the stories it tells, the values it promotes, and the audiences it seeks. This course approaches the YA phenomenon as one with deep historical roots as well as contemporary cultural relevance. From nineteenth century classics to current series favorites, literary works focused on young people reframe perennially fresh narratives about coming of age, negotiating personal identity, and navigating a complex moral universe. This course also considers YA literature as part of an evolving network of writers, readers, publishers, critics and filmmakers.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature,Honors

  • ENG-157 Poetry and Religion

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will use close readings to examine poetry as a heightened form of language seeking to make contact with divine sources of faith. We will consider poems that provide examples of the struggle to attain belief, as well as poems that deny belief. Language as both the grammar of ascent and the locus of descent. The position of human beings in relation to God, or the gods, or the absence of the divine.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature,Classics Minor

  • ENG-158 Nasty Women and Unruly Voices in American Literature

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course takes students on a tour of witches, nasty women," and other unruly tongues or bitter spirits throughout American literary history. Regularly assigned essays on the reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing. Fulfills the Literature Requirement of the CAS Core Curriculum.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-159 The Literature of London

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    For more than a thousand years, the city of London has been a cultural center, the home of playwrights and poets, novelists and critics, theaters and libraries. In this class we will read a wide range of literary works in different genres that take the city of London, and the experience of living or writing there, as central themes. The class will emphasize close reading and literary analysis of London texts, and will also explore contextualizing materials from newspaper articles to music and art. Designed to be taken in tandem with an optional one-credit study abroad trip to London, UK.

  • ENG-161 Writing the American West

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study of 20th century writing on the American West by American women and men in the form of novels, memoirs, and short stories. Regularly assigned reading responses and essays on the readings as well as discussion questions and quizzes provide the basis for the study of frontier or western literature by American authors. Fulfills the Literature Requirement of the CAS Core Curriculum.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-212 Introduction to Creative Writing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A study of the major genres in creative writing (poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction) in which students will read as writers. Students will write a combination of analytical and original works, and learn the format and processes of writing workshops of writing workshops. Offered every semester.

  • ENG-213 English Literature I

    Prerequisites:

    English Majors and Minors or Instructor Permission

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study of major writers of England from the beginning to the mid-18th century. Regularly assigned essays on the reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-214 English Literature II

    Prerequisites:

    English Majors and Minors or Instructor Permission

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study of major English writers from the mid-18th century to the present. Regularly assigned essays on the reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-216 World Literature in English

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A study of literature written in English from cultures around the world, with emphasis on major modern and contemporary writers from countries such as Australia, Canada, India, Ireland, Nigeria, South Africa and the Caribbean. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENG-217 American Literature I

    Prerequisites:

    English Majors and Minors or Instructor Permission

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study of major American writing from its origins through 1865. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-218 American Literature II

    Prerequisites:

    English Majors and Minors or Instructor Permission

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study of major American writing from 1865 through the present. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-266 Mad Men: Reading Visual Narratives

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The class will consider various theoretical approaches to the TV Series Mad Men beginning with ideas gleaned from the discourse of visual literacy and proceed by applying textual analysis adapted from more traditional modes of literary studies and film analysis. A combination of critical and evaluative critiques will be examined, including book-length studies of the series and essays based on the series' appeal to style, American popular culture, advertising, gender roles, race, and 60s nostalgia. The recent phenomenon of the series recap will serve as a touchstone to the class's collective viewing of the first two seasons of the series.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENG-H266 Mad Men: Reading Visual Narratives

    Prerequisites:

    Restricted to CAS Honor Students

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will focus on the cultural phenomenon of the TV Series Mad Men, considered by many to be the foremost example of Quality TV produced during the so-called golden age of television and engage with it on visual, cultural, literary and filmic levels. The basic premise of the course is that the current practice of binge watching one's favorite shows should be a heightened experience rather than a guilty pleasure, one akin to reading a novel. Watching a complex and sophisticated TV narrative involves taking into account the viewer's positionality as a filmic consumer, textual critic and social commentator. The class will consider various theoretical approaches to television narrative, beginning with ideas gleaned from the discourse of visual literacy, and proceed by applying textual analysis adapted from the more traditional modes of literary studies and film analysis. A combination of critical and evaluative sources will be examined, including book-length studies of the series, individual essays based on the series' appeal to style, American popular culture, advertising, gender roles, race, and 60s nostalgia. Additionally, the recent phenomenon of the series recap will serve as the touchstone to the class's collective viewing of the series and students will be challenged to synthesize and assess these popular on-line critiques as they draft their own recaps and creative readings of the episodes. The entire first two seasons of Mad Men will be studied and the invaluable resource of director/producer commentaries will be incorporated into the study of the series with a view to acquiring critical insights and analytical skills that may be applied to other quality TV series that students currently enjoy watching.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Honors

  • ENG-271 Writing for Digital Media

    Prerequisites:

    WRI 102 or WRI H103

    Credits:

    4.00

  • ENG-291 Introduction to Teaching English

    Prerequisites:

    Take WRI-102

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is an exploration of careers in Teaching English and Composition at the secondary and post-secondary level. Students will engage with theories of teaching and learning, practice designing assignments and lesson plans, and compose pedagogy statements that outline their informed stance on teaching. Students will consider the theoretical and practical aspects, or praxis, of a career in teaching as they learn about the day-to-day work of English teachers and the big ideas and commitments that drive people to teach.

  • ENG-301 Literary Criticism Seminar

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course seeks to answer the following questions. What is literature? Why do we study literature? What methods aid the study of literature? What are English Studies all about? This course extends reading and writing skills, and provides more specialized terms, knowledge, and approaches to prepare students for study at the junior and senior level. Topics vary from term to term.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ENG-311 Medieval Literature Survey

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to medieval literature, this course will focus on short readings from various genres, such as the lyric, chronicle, fable, with emphasis on the romance.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-312 English Grammar and Usage

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course provides a thorough review and analysis of the rules of standard English grammar and usage, including the debate between prescriptive and descriptive grammar, the origin and authority of the rules taught in school and in handbooks of English, and the insights of modern linguistics. Normally offered alternate years

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-316 Fifth Century Athens

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to Periclean Athens, the golden age of classical Greek literature and thought. Close readings of selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides, the dramatists Aeschylus and Euripides, the poetry of Pindar, and Plato's great work on politics, The Republic. Cross-listed with History 336.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Classics Minor

  • ENG-317 Classical Mythology

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Ancient Greek and Roman myths, their motifs, themes and interpretations. Normally offered every third year.

    Type:

    Classics Minor

  • ENG-320 Writing and Tutoring: Theory and Practice I

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course serves as the vehicle for training students who have been hired as writing tutors at CLAS. Students will be trained a one-on-one basis and will discuss a tutoring experience they have had in CLAS the previous week each class.

  • ENG-321 Writing and Tutoring: Theory and Practice II

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course is a continuation of ENG 320. This course serves as the vehicle for training students who have been hired as writing tutors at CLAS. Students will be trained a one-on-one basis and will discuss a tutoring experience they have had in CLAS the previous week each class.

  • ENG-323 Chaucer

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Close reading and discussion of the Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde against the background of the late Middle Ages. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-324 Shakespeare's Comedies

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Shakespeare's background and development as a dramatist through an examination of selected comedies. Collateral reading of the minor plays and Shakespeare criticism. Normally offered every third semester.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-325 Shakespeare's Histories

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Shakespeare's English and Roman history plays. Emphasis on Shakespeare's use of his sources and the plays in performance. Normally offered every third semester.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-E325 Service Learning Component

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    Service Learning Component

  • ENG-326 Shakespeare's Tragedies

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Shakespeare's major tragedies reflecting the range, resourcefulness, and power of his dramaturgy. Collateral reading in Shakespeare criticism. Normally offered every third semester.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-334 17th Century Literature

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Representative selections of seventeenth-century poetry and prose, including Behn, Burton, Donne Drayton, Dryden, Jonson, Milton, Pepys, Wroth, and others.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-344 English Romantic Literature

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The mind and spirit, poetics and poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats, along with selected prose.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-347 20th Century Female Gothic

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on Gothic literature by women writers, from its origins in the 18th century to the present, focusing primarily on 20th century writers. The novels, short stories, and films we will discuss involve haunted houses, secret chambers, madness, and other Gothic tropes. Writers to be studied will include Charlotte Bronte, Daphne du Maurier, Shirley Jackson, Jean Rhys, Angela Carter, and others.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-348 Jane Austen

    Prerequisites:

    Take WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces Jane Austen's major novels, including Pride and Prejudice and Mansfield Park, along with relevant current scholarship and contextualizing historical material. Contemporary parodies, updates, and film adaptations of Austen's work will also be considered. Topics to include the history of the novel, gender and authorship, and narrative theory.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-H348 Honors Jane Austen

    Prerequisites:

    Take WRI-102 or WRI-H103. Restricted to CAS Honors Students Only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces Jane Austen's major novels, including Pride and Prejudice and Mansfield Park, along with relevant current scholarship and contextualizing historical material. Contemporary parodies, updates, and film adaptations of Austen's work will also be considered. Topics to include the history of the novel, gender and authorship, and narrative theory.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Honors

  • ENG-352 Global American Literature

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores American and African American literature in the context of cosmopolitan thought and revolutionary action. This course considers how writers balance their interest in building a national culture with their desire for global adventure and their concern for matters of race, gender, politics, and civil rights that transcend their time and place. Includes readings from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as well as a contemporary American journalist's memoir about life in the Middle East.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-353 Dwelling in American Realism

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In-depth exploration of American Realism from the post-Civil War era to the pre-WWI era (roughly 1875 to 1915). Particular emphasis is given to the role of houses and material and consumer culture in the forging of American identity. Authors may include Howells, Twain, James and Wharton among others. Normally offered alternate years. Students will also visit authors' houses in the Boston area. This course requires prior approval in order to count towards the Women's and Gender Studies Minor. Students should consult with the instructor and the director of the WGS Minor no later than the first week of classes.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-355 American Prose 1870 - 1920

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-H103 (WRI-H103 requires a minimum grade of B+) or WRI-102

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The revolution in American literary consciousness between the Civil War and the First World War, and the transition from the traditional to the modern, in the work of Mark Twain, Henry James, Stephen Crane, Theodore Dreiser, and others.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-356 Whitman and Dickinson

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An investigation of the lives and works of two of nineteenth-century America's greatest and most original poets. Topics will include types of poetic language and formal structure, the work of the poetic imagination in transforming observations of the world into art, and the ways in which poets process the idea of death and the reality of war. Finally, this course examines Whitman and Dickinson's impact on American popular culture as well as on the writings of modern poets and literary critics.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-357 African-American Literature

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    African-American writing from the beginning through the present. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-358 Women Writing the American West

    Prerequisites:

    Take WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study of 19th and 20th century writing on the American West by American women in the form of novels, memoirs, and short stories. Regularly assigned reading responses and essays on the readings as well as discussion questions and quizzes provide the basis for the study of the gendering of the frontier and literature of the West by American women authors.

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-360 Mid-20th Century American Fiction 1950-1975

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The course will cover major works of American fiction from the period between World War II and the end of the American war in Vietnam. The course will consider fiction from the Beat Generation, New Journalism, the Black Arts Movement, and postmodernism as well as major writers who aren't easily classified. Possible authors include Ellison, Kerouac, O'Connor, McCarthy, Cheever, Roth, Updike, Didion, Mailer, Bellow, Bambara, Barth, and Pynchon.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-361 Contemporary American Fiction

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The course will cover major works of American fiction from the period between the end of the American war in Vietnam and the present. The course will emphasize fiction reflecting America's cultural diversity and current trends in fiction.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-362 Asian-American Literature

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to selected Asian-American writers with an emphasis on socio-cultural issues, such as race, gender and ethnicity. Authors include Bulosan, Hwang, Jen, Kingston, Lee, Mukherjee, Odada, and Tan.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Asian Studies,Studies in Literature

  • ENG-363 Modern British Poetry

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Yeats, Eliot, Auden, Dylan Thomas, Philip Larkin, Seamus Heaney and Ted Hughes and the considerable achievements of other poets from WWI to the present, including the influences of the Georgians, the imagists and the new poets. Verse drama will also be considered.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-370 Fiction Writing Workshop

    Prerequisites:

    ENG-212

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An intensive workshop in which the student will be required to write original fiction. The focus of the course will be on the student's own work, submitted on a weekly basis. The course will also provide the student writer with practical experience in matters of plot, character, dialogue, structure, etc. Normally offered annually.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

  • ENG-371 Creative Non-Fiction Workshop

    Prerequisites:

    ENG-212

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    For students interested in writing autobiography and/or other forms of the personal essay. Topics can include childhood, place, sexuality, religion, work, the nature of memory. The focus will be on the writing process, with students presenting work-in-progress to the class for discussion and revision. The student should plan to read models of creative non-fiction. Normally offered annually.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-375 Poetry Writing Workshop

    Prerequisites:

    ENG-212

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An intensive workshop course in which the student will be required to write original poetry for each class meeting. The focus of the course will be on the student's own work. We will examine the highly individual processes of composition and revision, and the methods writers use to keep their own practice of poetry alive and well. We will also examine as many of the constituent elements of poetry as possible, from image and rhythm to line and structure. Normally offered annually.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENG-376 Literary Publishing

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Students interested in the world of literary publishing will explore both traditional print and online publishing models, the importance of literary journals, and the best practices of literary citizenship, including how to write reviews, conduct author interviews, and promote the work of journals and presses through blogging and other social media. Students will learn from a variety of industry professionals, and work to produce original content that furthers the mission of Suffolk's two literary journals: Salamander, which is nationally distributed twice a year and edited professionally, and Venture, which is produced annually and edited by Suffolk students.

  • ENG-380 Wharton and James

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103 with a minimum grade of B+

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A study of the work of two of America's greatest Realist writers, considering the achievement of each and their extraordinary friendship.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-387 Writing Women

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course studies 19th and 20th century women writers and questions the type of women who write, what they write about, and why they write. Themes we examine include domesticity, assimilation, and madness. Authors studied in the past have included Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, Anzia Yezierska, Nella Larsen, and Sylvia Plath. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-388 Utopias and Dystopias

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course follows the spirit of utopian experimentation as it travels through the linguistic patterns and imaginative conditions of brave new worlds in literature. We will consider how utopian thinking allows writers to take creative license with political systems, social relations, gender roles, and racial identities, and to blur dividing lines between nature, technology, and culture as well as between Earth and the cosmos. Our readings will balance such foundational texts as Plato's Republic and More's Utopia with revolutionary works from the nineteenth through the twenty-first centuries, and conjure utopian dreams as well as dystopian worlds gone wrong. Selected works of literary criticism and films will also be included.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-390 Writing Process and Revision

    Prerequisites:

    Any ENG course except for WRI-101

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course studies the expressive and cognitive approaches to the writing process through personal journal writing, metaphor use and a review of grammar and stylistics. Written assignments emphasize discovery and invention as well as the revising of academic prose. Normally offered every other year.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-392 Readings in Post-Colonial Literature

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An Exploration of Post-colonial literature and how the empire writes back following the collapse of European colonialism. Special emphasis will be placed on the legacy of British Colonial rule and the contemporary use of literature and the English Language to both resist and problematize Eurocentric cultural assumptions. Authors studied will include E.M. Foster, Salman Rushdie, J.M. Coetzee, Anita Desai, Hanif Kureishi, and Zadie Smith, among others. Students will be introduced to Post-colonial critical theory and view film adaptations of literary texts.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-395 Rhetoric and Memoir

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the rhetoric of memoirs written primarily by international figures who seek to use personal stories to shape readers' perspectives on political issues. After a brief introduction to rhetorical theory and to the genre of memoir, this course will examine contemporary memoirs that address such issues as racism, sexism, religious extremism, war, and genocide.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Studies in Literature

  • ENG-396 Varieties of Workplace Writing

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course studies a variety of workplace writing including summaries,memos, letters, directions, descriptions, reports and other technical and professional documents. Students may be required to complete certain assignments in collaborative teams. Document design and layout will also be emphasized. Normally offered alternate years

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-398 Boston: a City in Fiction

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Boston in novels from its beginning to the present: plan of the city, architecture, population, social classes, politics and human problems. Hawthorne, James, Howells, Jean Stafford, Edwin O'Connor, Dorothy West, and others.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-399 Irish Literature

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Writers of the Irish Literary Revival, from the 1890s to the 1930s. Readings from Yeats, Joyce, Synge, O'Casey, and O'Flaherty. The influence of Anglo-Irish history on Irish writers.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-407 Literary Theory

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A seminar on current approaches to the interpretation of literature, including psychoanalysis, deconstruction and feminist criticism. Students will experiment with making use of theory in analyzing selected literary texts.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-408 Modern Greek Literature in English Translation

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103 with a minimum grade of B+

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A survey of writings in Modern Greek from 1821 to the present exploring Hellenism and the Greek cultural identity. Authors studied will include Kostis Palamas, Georgios Vizyinos, Alexandros Papadiamantis, Stratis Myrivilis, Photis Kontoglou, Dido Sotiriou, George Seferis, Constantine Cavafy, and Odysseas Elytis. A section of the syllabus will be reserved for the Greek-American/diaspora writers Helen Papanikolas, Elia Kazan, Jeffrey Eugenides, Olga Broumas, and Tryfon Tolides. Films and music traditions will be sampled as well.

    Type:

    Classics Minor

  • ENG-409 Literary Bloomsbury: Woolf and Forster

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This class will engage with the major novels and selected literary writings of two of the twentieth century's most important modernist voices, Virginia Woolf and E.M. Forster. We will approach their writings within the intellectual framework of British modernism and the cultural context of the Bloomsbury Group out of which they emerged. Special attention will be paid to their theoretical writings on fiction as well as their respective contributions to feminism and queer theory. The class will also view cinematic adaptations of certain novels and discuss how these films have contributed to the enduring appeal and status of these texts as classics of twentieth-century fiction.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-410 From Pagan Reason to Christian Revelation

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A survey of major works of literature and thought crucial to the transformation of pagan models of reason to Christian systems of belief, including works by Plato and Plotinus, St. Augustine and Dante. Of central concern is the changing conception of love, from Eros to Agape. Note: This course is cross-listed with HST 339.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Classics Minor,Studies in Literature

  • ENG-422 Special Topics in Group 2: Genre and Backgrounds

    Prerequisites:

    Any 200-level English course

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A course that fits Group 2 of the English major requirements with varying subject matter.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-424 Special Topics in Group 4: Literary History II : 1700-1900, American or British

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A course that fits Group 4 of the English major requirements with varying subject matter. A interdisciplinary offering that features the writing of three of the late 19th century's greatest minds: Henry, the novelist who wrote The Portrait of a Lady, Daisy Miller, and The Turn of the Screw; William, the philosopher and psychologist who wrote Principles of Psychology (1890) and Varieties of Religious Experience (1902); and Alice, their sister, who became a feminist icon through her remarkable diary. A selection of these works will be explored alongside a James family biography.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-426 Virgil's Eclogues

    Prerequisites:

    Any 200-level English course

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A study of these poems by the Roman poet with a focus on the issues of translation.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-428 Virgil's Aeneid: First Three Books

    Prerequisites:

    Any 200-level English course

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A week by week reading of the Mesopotamian Epic that predates the Iliad by one thousand years, and is a masterpiece of heroic endurance and tragic insight. Discussions will be led by David Ferry, whose beautiful translation the class will use as text.

  • ENG-429 Classic Literature of the Underworld

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course will conduct close reading and discussion of selections from classical Greek and Roman texts, as well as from ancient Mesopotamian texts, highlighting passages that trace the descent to the underworld. Some of these readings include: the realm of the shades in Gilgamesh, the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice in Virgil, Homer's Odysseus and Achilles in Hades, the source of the River Styx in Pausanias.

  • ENG-430 Literature of the Vietnam War and the Post 9/11 Wars

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will examine some of the fiction, non-fiction, and poetry produced in response to the Vietnam War and the most recent war in Iraq. In addition to comparing the literature that has emerged from these two very different wars, these texts will also be examined in relation to peace studies, a field in which there is an emerging consensus that literature and the arts must play a central role in examining questions of war and peace.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-432 Classical Greek and Roman Poetry

    Prerequisites:

    Any 200 level ENG course.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A close reading of verse passages from various texts of narrative and lyric poetry. In particular the Roman absorption of, and resistance to, their Greek literary inheritance will be stressed.

  • ENG-440 The Odes of Horace

    Prerequisites:

    Any 200-level English course

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course represents a journey through the poetry of Horace, contemporary of Virgil and celebrated poet of the Pax Romana. Discussions will be led by David Ferry, whose beautiful translation of Horace's poetry the class will use as text.

  • ENG-470 Fiction Workshop II

    Prerequisites:

    Any 200-level English course

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An intensive practical examination of plot, narrative, characterization, and style in the writing of fiction and/or creative non-fiction. Particular attention will be devoted to group discussion of weekly student writing assignments. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

  • ENG-471 Advanced Nonfiction Workshop

    Prerequisites:

    Any 200-level English course

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    n advanced course in non-fiction writing that focuses intensively on developing non-fiction through weekly group discussions of student writing. Particular attention will be devoted toward deepening and expanding the range of possibilities available to non-fiction writers.Topics can include childhood, place, sexuality, religion, work, the nature of memory. The focus will be on the writing process, with students presenting work-in-progress to the class for discussion and revision. Normally offered annually.

  • ENG-475 Poetry Workshop II

    Prerequisites:

    Any 200-level English course

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An intensive workshop course in which the student will be required to write original poetry for each class meeting. The focus of the course will be on both the quantity and quality of the student's own work. There will also be specific assignments in the many formal elements of the art. Written self-evaluations will also be required. Normally offered in alternate years.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ENG-476 Salamander Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    Take ENG-212

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Salamander is a nationally known professional literary journal published from the Suffolk University English Department. In the Salamander Practicum course, students serve as first evaluators of submissions to the magazine, including poetry, fiction, and memoir. They will compare and discuss their evaluations and make recommendations to the editorial board and assist with magazine production, marketing, and event planning. Students will study and write literary analyses of works included in Salamander and in other professional literary journals, such as Ploughshares, Agni, One Story, and the Harvard Review.

  • ENG-490 Imperial Rome

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course offers an introduction to the Golden Age of Roman culture and power. Close readings of selections from major historians, poets, political thinkers, and philosophers will be examined in the context of Augustan Rome. Topics such as pietas, virtus, and gravitas, as well as the competing claims of public duty and private devotion, stoic maxim and erotic love lyric, will be discussed from the perspectives of writers such as Virgil, Livy, Tacitus, Horace, Catullus, and Lucretius. Note: This course is cross-listed with HST 304. Normally offered in alternate years.

    Type:

    Classics Minor

  • ENG-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    By special arrangement, a junior or senior may pursue an independent research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Consent of instructor and chairperson required. Offered every semester.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ENG-H510 Honors Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103; Honors students only

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    By special arrangement, a junior or senior may pursue an independent research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Consent of instructor and chairperson required. Offered every semester.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Honors

  • ENG-514 Internship in English

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Individualized guidance in a career-related activity. Upper-class English majors may gain academic credit for work preparing them for an English-related career, provided that the work is monitored by a member of the English faculty. Department approval is required.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENG-515 Salamander Internship

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A semester-long internship working with the Editor and Managing Editor of Salamander Literary Magazine. Students will gain experience in editing, layout, and production of one of two annual editions of Salamander.

  • ENG-H523 Honors Seminar in Group 3: Literary History I: Medieval to Renaissance

    Prerequisites:

    ENG 213, 214, 215, 216, 217 OR 218 Admission By Invitation Only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Honors seminar that fulfills Group 3 of the English major.

    Type:

    Honors

  • ENG-H524 Honors Seminar: 1700 - 1900

    Prerequisites:

    ENG-213, 214, 215, 216, 217 OR ENG 218 Admission by invitation only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Honors seminar that fulfills Group I of the English major.

    Type:

    Honors

  • ENG-H525 Honors Seminar: 1900 - Present

    Prerequisites:

    ENG 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, or ENG 218; Invitation only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Honors seminar that fulfills Group I of the English major.

    Type:

    Honors

  • ENG-H555 Senior Honors Thesis

    Prerequisites:

    Restricted to CAS Honors students or other English majors with a GPA of 3.5 or above in English courses admitted by application to the department by the end of their junior year.

    Credits:

    1.00- 3.00

    Description:

    Independent reading, research, and writing under the supervision of a full-time English faculty member. Restricted to CAS Honors students or other English majors with a GPA of 3.5 or above in English courses admitted by application to the department by the end of their junior year. Normally taken for 1 credit in the Fall and 3 credits in the Spring of senior year.

  • WRI-100 Developmental Writing I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course affords students extended practice with persuasive and expository writing in the essay form through frequent writing assignments based on critical readings of class texts and discussions. Students will also compose a research paper and study the process of writing and revising for an academic audience. No standard pre-requisites; offered every semester. Students who are placed into WRI-100 must complete the course with a C in order to continue on to WRI-101.

  • WRI-100+ Developmental Writing - Tutorial Section

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course affords students extended practice with persuasive and expository writing in the essay form through frequent writing assignments based on critical readings of class texts and discussions. Students will also compose a research paper and study the process of writing and revising for an academic audience. No standard pre-requisites; offered every semester. WRI-100+ sections require students to meet with their instructors once per week for a thirty-minute, one-to-one tutorial session, to be scheduled by the instructor with each individual student. Students who are placed into WRI-100+ must complete the course with a C in order to continue on to WRI-101.

  • WRI-101 First Year Writing I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study and practice of the writing process and revision in terms of expository writing modes for an academic audience.

  • WRI-L101 Developmental Writing 101 Lab

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    A non credit course for students enrolled in Freshman Composition who need to improve their control of the writing process, English mechanics, and fluency of expression. WRI L101 is a hybrid course that combines online grammar and writing practice with face-to-face support from English instructors.

  • WRI-102 First Year Writing II

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-101 or ENG-099 with at least a B and ENG-P099 with a P or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study and practice of argumentative and research writing through further work with writing process and revision and the critical reading of a variety of texts.

  • WRI-H102 Honors First Year Writing II

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-101 or ENG-099 with at least a B and ENG-P099 with a P or WRI-H103. Restricted to CAS Honors Students with the following majors: Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Computer Science, Environmental Science, Mathematics, Physics, Radiation Science and Radiation Therapy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study and practice of argumentative and research writing through further work with writing process and revision and the critical reading of a variety of texts.

    Type:

    Honors

  • WRI-H103 Advanced First Year Writing

    Prerequisites:

    By Invitation Only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is by invitation only and reserved for incoming Suffolk students with high admission scores. Advanced study and practice of writing process, revision, and research, based on close readings of a variety of texts. Fall semester only.

    Type:

    Honors